Become A Member | Forum | Profiles | Personals | Classifieds | See Who's Online ...
 
View Topic
  Message Boards : Activism / Politics : View Topic : 103 Posts, Page 7 of 7
  HomeNewNoticesHot TopicsPollsStatsBlogs Login / Register
 
Keep/Repeal The 8th, Referendum?
 
 Poll Choices 18 Total Votes
66.67% / 12 Votes
33.33% / 6 Votes
 You Need To Be Logged In To Vote In Polls ...
 
# 91 : Monday 23-10-2017 @ 07:58
 
 
Someone said :

probably but accidents happen
It is as likely someone would have died over the last 30 years if abortion was legal due to complications

Womens healthcare is negatively impacted by the 8th amendment. If a womans health is at risk during her pregnancy doctors cannot in a lot of cases cannot intervene because they have to treat the foetus equally.
Reply
 
 Recent Message Board Topics
Would You Eat Bugs (Entomophagy) To Save The Planet?
Ftm Who Is Attracted To Women. Where To Find Women Interested?
Non Random Thoughts..
What Song Are You Listening To Now?!?!
Dead Thread 2017
Brexit
The Moral Cesspit That Is Hollywood
New To Dublin
 
Hey! If you enjoy shooting the breeze with like-minded people, check out
our Message Boards
• Advice • Coming Out
• Computers • Current Affairs
• Discussion • Food & Drink
• Going Out • Humour
• Health • Music
• Newbies • Sexual Issues
# 92 : Monday 23-10-2017 @ 13:56
 
 
No I'm asking why men because all of our institutions are dominated by men ( insert statistics here) insist on legislating on women's bodies ?
Why is that?
And I'm saying in the the hypothetical case that men could get pregnant not only would there be no 8th but abortion would be freely available on demand and childbirth would be pain free etc

Someone said :

Are you suggesting that only female TD's and Senators should be allowed to vote on the proposed referendum?
And that only female voters be allowed to vote on it?

You do realize that the 8th Amendement, making the unborn's right to life equal to that of the mother, was passed by 66.90%?
Do you think no women voted then, in 1983?

You do realize (but do you care) that the 13th, about allowing for travel, was passed by 62.39%. (It was not referring explicitly to any "procedure"...) This was in 1992

And of course, you see that on the same day as the 13th, the 14th was only passed by 59.88%. This was explicitly about freedom to be informed about "information relating to services lawfully available in another state."
Do you think that the 2.51% difference were only men, who allow women to travel to but only if they are uninformed, or if all they want is visit Big Ben?

You realize that the anti-abortion activist UCD students' union president is Katie Ascoug, a woman!

Or maybe you mean that only women who have been pregnant should be allowed a say in the matter?
Or do you mean that only women who had pregnancies terminated ni ways that are not legal in the State should have their say.

And of course, only people subject to paying VAT back to the State should have a say on the VAT rate. And only children should vote on child protection. And only drinkers and smokers should vote on excise duties. What about people who vape?

Reply
 
# 93 : Friday 27-10-2017 @ 18:47
 
 
Someone said :
No I'm asking why men because all of our institutions are dominated by men ( insert statistics here) insist on legislating on women's bodies ?
Why is that?
And I'm saying in the the hypothetical case that men could get pregnant not only would there be no 8th but abortion would be freely available on demand and childbirth would be pain free etc

If we wanted to legalize abortion, it would need to be passed by our representatives, whom we have chosen: most are men.

Would you rather no legislation was ever passed since 1927, as soon as it has to do with "women's bodies", until the Dáil has 90% of women?

By the way, does it mean that men never go to the dentist? Because I still find it painful enough...
Reply
 
# 94 : Wednesday 1-11-2017 @ 22:41
 
 
Someone said :

If we wanted to legalize abortion, it would need to be passed by our representatives, whom we have chosen: most are men.

Would you rather no legislation was ever passed since 1927, as soon as it has to do with "women's bodies", until the Dáil has 90% of women?

By the way, does it mean that men never go to the dentist? Because I still find it painful enough...

Ask your mother about your birth and see if she likes you comparing it to going to the dentist?

There is a simulator device to give an example of the pain women feel during childbirth and you can try it before you try to compare to something you know because you don't know anything about it.
Just answer when insist on legislating on women's bodies!
Discuss your own body if you have any clue how it works but do you really think you should be discussing women's bodies when you don't have a clue how they work what they feel or either have any sympathy for any pain they feel.
Reply
 
# 95 : Wednesday 1-11-2017 @ 23:08
 
 
I wish people were as passionate about other woes in our society, homelessness, the money pit health service, the highest University charges in the Eurozone, mental health and apathy.
Reply
 
# 96 : Wednesday 1-11-2017 @ 23:38
 
 
That's called "WHATABOUTERY" sortedguy. Undermine an issue and a very important one at that by comparing it to other issues as if to make the issue a non issue. It was persistently done with marriage equality by the No side. What about *insert other social issue*?
Reply
 
# 97 : Friday 3-11-2017 @ 16:38
 
 
Someone said :

Ask your mother about your birth and see if she likes you comparing it to going to the dentist?

My mother is not thick: she understood that both men and women go to the dentist, and it is painful for both of them. Like post-op for any painful operation is painful.

If your theory was correct, dentist visits and all post-ops would be painless.

You were suggesting that birth is painful to the mother because men do not have to go through it. That is utter non-sense!
Reply
 
# 98 : Saturday 4-11-2017 @ 08:49
 
 
Someone said :

My mother is not thick: she understood that both men and women go to the dentist, and it is painful for both of them. Like post-op for any painful operation is painful.

If your theory was correct, dentist visits and all post-ops would be painless.

You were suggesting that birth is painful to the mother because men do not have to go through it. That is utter non-sense!

Of course the point is men shouldn't be legislating on women's bodies and all the rest is just deflection
Reply
 
# 99 : Saturday 4-11-2017 @ 10:50
 
 
Someone said :

Of course the point is men shouldn't be legislating on women's bodies and all the rest is just deflection

So you are against modifying Article 40.3.3:
- It would require a mostly male parliament to enact it
- It would require a male president to give the go ahead
- It would require Ireland's men to also vote, and you told them to not legislate on women's bodies so that 48% of Irish people (men) who you want to vote "NO" to changing Article 40.3.3, hoping that 100% of the women (52% of the population) will vote in favor of that male-driven referendum.

And we all know that 100% of women who are not president of a student union are against Article 40.3.3...

And of course, you would require men to not take part in organizing, supervising, controlling, tallying, collating, return officering, announcing, commenting the results.

And, what about the Referendum Commission, which last time round included 1 woman...
with most position being filled based on the institutional role of the post holders:
it was chaired by the Hon Mr Justice Kevin Cross of the High Court. Its other members were the Ombudsman, Mr Peter Tyndall; the Comptroller and Auditor General, Mr Seamus McCarthy; the Clerk Assistant of the Dáil, Mr Peter Finnegan; and the Clerk of the Seanad, Ms Deirdre Lane.
How may women would that be then, this time? Given that the current Clerk of Seanad Éireann is Martin Groves?

"Men shouldn't be legislating on women's bodies" is just an empty pseudo-inspirational gimmick.
Especially when women tend to be more conservative in those matters than men!
Check out http://www.irishtimes.com/news/social-affairs/irish-times-poll-ma etc ... which indicated@
There was no major difference in opinion between men and women on the issue with women marginally more in favour in retaining the blanket prohibition on abortion. Women were also less inclined than men to favour a liberal abortion regime on the British model.

It is not major... it would still be passed with a comfortable majority... but it does not really support the simplistic and populist that only people who are concerned by something should have a voice to legislate about it!

What next?
Only the poor TD's can vote on poverty issues?
Only tax dodger can vote on tax dodging?
Only animal owners can vote on animal welfare?
Only drivers can vote on car?

That only tells me one thing (assuming I give you credit for not being a complete moron): you believe that politics and legislation is about the selfish interests of individual lobby groups, and that legislators do not care for the public interest or the common good.
Reply
 
# 100 : Saturday 4-11-2017 @ 15:39
 
 
Someone said :

So you are against modifying Article 40.3.3:
- It would require a mostly male parliament to enact it
- It would require a male president to give the go ahead
- It would require Ireland's men to also vote, and you told them to not legislate on women's bodies so that 48% of Irish people (men) who you want to vote "NO" to changing Article 40.3.3, hoping that 100% of the women (52% of the population) will vote in favor of that male-driven referendum.

And we all know that 100% of women who are not president of a student union are against Article 40.3.3...

And of course, you would require men to not take part in organizing, supervising, controlling, tallying, collating, return officering, announcing, commenting the results.

And, what about the Referendum Commission, which last time round included 1 woman...
with most position being filled based on the institutional role of the post holders:
it was chaired by the Hon Mr Justice Kevin Cross of the High Court. Its other members were the Ombudsman, Mr Peter Tyndall; the Comptroller and Auditor General, Mr Seamus McCarthy; the Clerk Assistant of the Dáil, Mr Peter Finnegan; and the Clerk of the Seanad, Ms Deirdre Lane.
How may women would that be then, this time? Given that the current Clerk of Seanad Éireann is Martin Groves?

"Men shouldn't be legislating on women's bodies" is just an empty pseudo-inspirational gimmick.
Especially when women tend to be more conservative in those matters than men!
Check out http://www.irishtimes.com/news/social-affairs/irish-times-poll-ma etc ... which indicated@

It is not major... it would still be passed with a comfortable majority... but it does not really support the simplistic and populist that only people who are concerned by something should have a voice to legislate about it!

What next?
Only the poor TD's can vote on poverty issues?
Only tax dodger can vote on tax dodging?
Only animal owners can vote on animal welfare?
Only drivers can vote on car?

That only tells me one thing (assuming I give you credit for not being a complete moron): you believe that politics and legislation is about the selfish interests of individual lobby groups, and that legislators do not care for the public interest or the common good.

Ridiculous
Something doesn't work if people have to walk across the border to solve it!

The U.K. Gov will pay the travel expenses of women going from NI for abortion that's how dumb their situation is .

Here it's even dumber because our women won't have their travel expenses paid by our gov for even more ridiculous legislation and men like you more interested in their diarrhea ideas and thoughts and words than in showing any empathy for any woman who has had to have an abortion or will have to have an abortion.
Reply
 
# 101 : Saturday 4-11-2017 @ 20:38
 
 
Someone said :

[...]men like you more interested in their diarrhea ideas and thoughts and words than in showing any empathy for any woman who has had to have an abortion or will have to have an abortion.

Men like me are interested in liberalizing abortion without taking poser's populist stances like "men should not legislate on women's bodies". Men like you have more sympathy for their inflated sense as self appointed "women's advocate", than for the reality of how things work in real life.

Reply
 
# 102 : Sunday 5-11-2017 @ 02:02
 
 
Someone said :

Men like me are interested in liberalizing abortion without taking poser's populist stances like "men should not legislate on women's bodies". Men like you have more sympathy for their inflated sense as self appointed "women's advocate", than for the reality of how things work in real life.

How dous your liberalizing abortion model work? In the reality of the real life ? As you call it ...
Reply
 
# 103 : Sunday 5-11-2017 @ 05:51
 
 
Someone said :

How dous your liberalizing abortion model work? In the reality of the real life ? As you call it ...

Do you not realise that you both agree on the same thing?
Reply
 
Prev 1234567Next