Become A Member | Forum | Profiles | Personals | Classifieds | See Who's Online ...
 
View Topic
  Message Boards : Love / Health : View Topic : 43 Posts, Page 3 of 3
  HomeNewNoticesHot TopicsPollsStatsBlogs Login / Register
 
Adults Boomeranging Back At Parents': Stuck, Or Entitled?
 
 Poll Choices 16 Total Votes
0.00% / 0 Votes
12.50% / 2 Votes
87.50% / 14 Votes
 You Need To Be Logged In To Vote In Polls ...
 
# 31 : Friday 7-7-2017 @ 21:29
 
 

It's not like this stuff is picked out of thin air. The picture S4 paints of young peoole as lazy good for nothing scroungers is completely untrue. The data is clear. Young people have paid more for the crisis than their parents generation.


http://www.nerinstitute.net/blog/2017/05/29/intergenerational-ine etc ...

http://www.nerinstitute.net/research/neri-research-inbrief-interg etc ...

http://www.esri.ie/publications/the-intergenerational-impact-of-t etc ...


Reply
 
 Recent Message Board Topics
The Moral Cesspit That Is Hollywood
Brexit
Where Is A Good Place To Find Like Minded Curious Guys?
Helping Me With The
Black Friday
Non Random Thoughts..
Crossdressing Text Chat
Eurovision Song Contest 2018
 
Hey! If you enjoy shooting the breeze with like-minded people, check out
our Message Boards
• Advice • Coming Out
• Computers • Current Affairs
• Discussion • Food & Drink
• Going Out • Humour
• Health • Music
• Newbies • Sexual Issues
# 32 : Friday 7-7-2017 @ 22:04
 
 
Someone said :

The picture S4 paints of young peoole as lazy good for nothing scroungers

I said nothing of the sort.
You do realise I'm not exactly over the hill? I'm 44 for goodness sake.
I came from humble beginnings and just had to find my way.
Reply
 
# 33 : Sunday 9-7-2017 @ 16:25
 
 
I hated having to move back home. In the last seven years I was made redundant twice and a business went under. I moved home for a year in 2011/2012. Then when I lost my job in 2013, I managed to maintain some independence with the help of my partner and flat mate. But then the business went under and my Dad died so I moved home for a few months again.

To be honest I may consider a few more months at home again if I have to. But I'm lucky to have a shitty apartment for reasonable rent ( similar shitholes going for 50% more) so we're saving for a deposit easily enough since we both got promoted. But the recession really did hold me back and if I was single I would struggle to pay Dublin rents.
Reply
 
# 34 : Sunday 9-7-2017 @ 17:48
 
 
Rents have exploded. The price of housing has enormously increased. The availability of credit is significantly reduced. The deposit requirements are very high. Unemployment while it has improved, remains stubbornly high among young people. Job security has been utterly transformed from just a couple of decades ago and in a very negative way.

These are the facts, these are the factors that have lead to an increased number of young people residing at home for longer periods.

In the 90s my mother had a relatively low grade position in the public service, my Father was a farm labourer. Neither had degrees etc. They were able to purchase a home in a major middle class suburb of Dublin, semi detached, three bedrooms, decent gardens and they did so while paying rent. My Partner and I have college degrees and masters, good permanent pensionable jobs, with decent pay. There is no chance we could purchase a home at this time, and it is not because we are indebted due to avocado-lattes, it is because of a massive macro-economic transformation in our country.
Reply
 
# 35 : Sunday 9-7-2017 @ 21:37
 
 
Yep. People in their 40s/50s may have bought in boomtimes too when banks were throwing money at them even if they had crappy credit. I'm working in public sector jobs two and half years now but the advice I got was not to apply till I'm five years off the dole because of missed payments on a loan I had. It really pisses me off when people tell me I'm mad not to buy, I wish I bloody could!
Reply
 
# 36 : Monday 10-7-2017 @ 17:36
 
 
What do you mean by young people? What age bracket are we talking about?
Reply
 
# 37 : Monday 10-7-2017 @ 17:46
 
 
Someone said :
What do you mean by young people? What age bracket are we talking about?

Whom are you asking?
Reply
 
# 38 : Monday 10-7-2017 @ 17:57
 
 
Someone said :

Whom are you asking?

Anyone really. I'm just interested as there could be loads of different answers.
What is young?
Reply
 
# 39 : Monday 10-7-2017 @ 17:58
 
 
I bought in 2007. I would be considered young then.
Reply
 
# 40 : Monday 10-7-2017 @ 18:21
 
 
Someone said :

Anyone really. I'm just interested as there could be loads of different answers.
What is young?

In publishing, young adults are 12-18.
Young "people" usually refers to teenagers (13-19).

You might consider that age limits give different ranges of youth for different areas: consenting to legal decisions, leaving school, marrying, voting, working, drinking, driving, being an apprentice, joining the army, being party to a contract, being a candidate to various elections or nominated to various posts, booking a holiday or flying unaccompanied, gambling, buying cigarettes or nicotine-based products, leaving home, going to prison, having sex (hopefully not in that order), partaking in jury duty or social welfare.

Some psychologists will tell you youth stops at around 40, ...
Anyone under 35 is too young to be elected president of Ireland. (Give or take a year depending on whether you read the constitution in Irish or in English...)

Even if some people have referred to "young people" or "youth" in this thread, these are pointless and inoperative concepts, as far as this thread is concerned.

So if they fancy answering, so be it.
But it smells like this will just bring the thread off-course. Of course.

Reply
 
# 41 : Monday 10-7-2017 @ 20:44
 
 
Someone said :
What do you mean by young people? What age bracket are we talking about?

Under 35
Reply
 
# 42 : Tuesday 18-7-2017 @ 16:24
 
 
It seems that according to Central Statistic (CSO) figures, almost half a million adult children are still nesting with their parents:
- 98,739 are unemployed
- 180,703 are at work
- 137,967 are students

In Western Europe, Ireland has one of the highest rates of 25-34 year olds living at home at 22.6%.
UK = 14.4%.
Scandinavians have the lowest rate of young adults staying in their family home with just 1.8% of Danes living with parents, 4.2% of Norwegians, 4.1% of Swedes and 4.0% of Finns.

As you go further south and east, Ireland seems less of an oddity: Slovakia has the highest rate of young adults living at home, and Portugal/Italy/Greece have twice as many young people living with their parents as Ireland.

Tells us something about the Irish economy being in fact closer to the usual PIGS's metrics than to those of France/UK/Germany. No surprise there. Ireland remains the better off of the PIGS!
Reply
 
# 43 : Tuesday 18-7-2017 @ 18:31
 
 
It has a lot to do with religion.
Catholic countries = no sex before marriage.
You didn't move out until you got married.
It's changing of course but it was tradition.
Reply
 
Prev 123Next