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What's The First Year Of Age?
 
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# 1 : Sunday 6-8-2017 @ 06:40
 
 
If you have to give a child, or a dog, a vaccine "in the first year of age".

Do you give it when they are 6 months, or 16 months?

What if they have to received it when they have reached their first year of age? Do you consider it to be the same as "in / within their first year of age"?
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# 2 : Sunday 6-8-2017 @ 11:32
 
 
I think "in the first year of age" is awful English, and rather than try interpret it, whoever needs to follow an instruction that contains it should as a relevant expert (doctor or vet in the examples) if it means "in the first year of life" or "when the [child | pet] is aged 1".


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# 3 : Sunday 6-8-2017 @ 11:38
 
 
I'd be of the opinion that it means somewhere between 6 months before and 6 months after their first birthday although saying that it's not really an iron clad rule, it's more of a recommendation of when it is optimal to do it but's it's not like waiting until they are 2 years old will cause any negative effects (although depending on the vaccine doing it before they are 6 months old might be harmful but the upper age boundary is a bit more flexable). It's like the difference between a "Use by" date and a "Best before" date, in this case "in the first year" would be equivalent to a "Best before" date
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# 4 : Sunday 6-8-2017 @ 14:49
 
 
If you are 35 years old, you are in your 36th year.
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# 5 : Sunday 6-8-2017 @ 17:46
 
 
Someone said :
If you are 35 years old, you are in your 36th year.

Indeed.
But is "1st year of age" understood to mean 1st year of life (before 1st birthday), as in your example; or does it mean the year when you are "1 year old", meaning after your 1st birthday.

In otherwords, does the "of age" change the age referencial?

Just like "Monday week" is not the same as "next Monday". But when people use it, you cannot bank on them using either correctly!

So the question, @Ozran, is not just to know if I should ask the person what they mean.
The question is: is there a definite "it means this and nothing else (and people often make the mistake)". I am even open to the possibility that it may be specific to the Irish English, and maybe linked to an expression as Gaeilge .
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# 6 : Sunday 6-8-2017 @ 19:10
 
 
For me, it would be anything between 0 and 12 months.
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# 7 : Sunday 6-8-2017 @ 19:14
 
 
Someone said :

Indeed.
But is "1st year of age" understood to mean 1st year of life (before 1st birthday), as in your example; or does it mean the year when you are "1 year old", meaning after your 1st birthday.

In otherwords, does the "of age" change the age referencial?

Just like "Monday week" is not the same as "next Monday". But when people use it, you cannot bank on them using either correctly!

So the question, @Ozran, is not just to know if I should ask the person what they mean.
The question is: is there a definite "it means this and nothing else (and people often make the mistake)". I am even open to the possibility that it may be specific to the Irish English, and maybe linked to an expression as Gaeilge .

I think you are reading too much into it, it is not a definitive term in that there aren't any rules wrote down to say for sure what it means, it is a general guideline that's not suppose to be taken literally. I suppose it is one of those cases where society gives you a vague time line and expects you to have at least some common sense about it. It doesn't take an genius to know that before "1st year of age" doesn't mean injecting a two day old baby with a vaccine would be a good idea and as Ozren said if you are that confused just ask your Doctor/vet because you obviously wouldn't be in a position to make the decision yourself and besides they'll probably be the ones making the decision of when is the right time for you anyway unless you are qualified to administer vaccines to minors yourself?
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# 8 : Sunday 6-8-2017 @ 21:27
 
 
Thanks but that does not answer the question.

After all, if the pup was injected at 2 days and died, a judge would hear the case and would have to decide if the instructions on the notice meant "before 1st birthday" or "after 1st birthday".
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# 9 : Sunday 6-8-2017 @ 22:55
 
 
Someone said :
Thanks but that does not answer the question.

After all, if the pup was injected at 2 days and died, a judge would hear the case and would have to decide if the instructions on the notice meant "before 1st birthday" or "after 1st birthday".

It does answer the question in that everything I have said so far covers every single boundary and all related equivalencies, if what you want to hear is something outside the boundaries you are setting then I can't help you there because nothing I say will be right because you want to apply a literal translation to a situation that requires a more "based on experience" approach, Also

"if the pup was injected at 2 days and died, a judge would hear the case and would have to decide if the instructions on the notice meant "before 1st birthday" or "after 1st birthday"

Doesn't apply because it wouldn't be you giving the injection it would be a trained vet and no vet on the planet would vaccinate a pup after only two days for 3 reasons, firstly for the first 10 week while weaning they are covered by their mothers immune system, secondly because the vaccine would have the effect of a poison not a cure and thirdly because it would be as stupid and irresponsible as hell.

You aren't even making sense here, I'm sure to you it seems like you are but you have to accept at one point or another a proper interpretation of a recommendation saying "in the first year of age" is pretty well covered using the boundary values > than 6 months AND < 3 years
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# 10 : Monday 7-8-2017 @ 03:05
 
 
@Smurfette,
thanks for your effort, but I;ll be the judge of whether my question is answered or not. And it is not.
You are just trying to justify getting an uncommitted answer. That is your right. Don't worry about it, I am sure others will interested in answering the question I asked as opposed to telling me what they think the question should be.

You are missing the point: the question is about the semantics, not the practical example given to support it.
Do you seriously think that I have a real-life conundrum where a child and a pup are inter-changeable?

(Kevsamo and Intrepid have provided answers that fit the question beautifully: they both agree that "1st year of age" = "1st year of life" = before 1st anniversary = between first day of life and 12 months old.
The question now is: are they right?; or is there an authorized interpretation that would suggest that instead it is between 12 months and 24 months, thus the first year of being 1, thus after the first birthday?)

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# 11 : Sunday 20-8-2017 @ 18:33
 
 
Someone said :
If you have to give a child, or a dog, a vaccine "in the first year of age".

Do you give it when they are 6 months, or 16 months?

What if they have to received it when they have reached their first year of age? Do you consider it to be the same as "in / within their first year of age"?

In their first year.
Between 0 and 12 months of age.
Not after they've turned a year old. Before that.
At 6 months, they are within the prescribed limit, at 16 they're overdue a vaccination by at least four months.
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