Become A Member | Forum | Profiles | Personals | Classifieds | See Who's Online ...
 
View Topic
  Message Boards : General Discussion : View Topic : 22 Posts, Page 2 of 2
  HomeNewNoticesHot TopicsPollsStatsBlogs Login / Register
 
Do You Believe In Alien Life..?
 
 Poll Choices 7 Total Votes
14.29% / 1 Vote
71.43% / 5 Votes
14.29% / 1 Vote
 You Need To Be Logged In To Vote In Polls ...
 
# 16 : Friday 15-12-2017 @ 18:25
 
 
Someone said :
we developed at this atmospheric pressure but on our own planet we don't even know how deep our own oceans are because the atmospheric pressure there is so great we can't explore .
Only recently they discovered life near underwater volcanoes in conditions that wouldn't have been considered survivable.
The idea that only carbon based life exists because we are carbon based is a bit narrow .

We actually do know how deep the oceans are - the ocean floor was mapped in the 1960s using sonar. We even dived to the deepest spot - Mariana Trench off The Philllipines back in 1960s. But we don’t know the ocean floor in great detail - the surface of Mars is better mapped.

Undersea volcanoes have been known since the 1970s.
Reply
 
 Recent Message Board Topics
Funny Pictures To Brighten Your Day - Funny Edition
Sad News.
Celebrity Big Brother 2018
Dancing On Ice
Who Do You Find Interesting On Instagram?
Live Gigs From Bands You Admire
What Song Are You Listening To Now?!?!
Rant Thread 7
 
Hey! If you enjoy shooting the breeze with like-minded people, check out
our Message Boards
• Advice • Coming Out
• Computers • Current Affairs
• Discussion • Food & Drink
• Going Out • Humour
• Health • Music
• Newbies • Sexual Issues
# 17 : Friday 15-12-2017 @ 20:13
 
 
I watched a cool video on how, if the sun were to disappear and Earth and all the other planets were flung into Outer-space, all life on the surface would die within a few months. But micro-habitats living deep under the ocean that get there energy and oxygen from geothermic activity, would carry on living for all of eternity until it were destroyed by a cataclysmic event such as the planet getting ripped apart by a star or black hole.


The problem with that is, this only works on a celestial object the size of Earth or bigger (big enough to have geothermic activity from which to draw life giving energy). It cannot work on an asteroid or even a small planet. For example Mars is too small and has too weak a liquid core to stop the surface being constantly radioactively sterilized by the Sun and in general exposed to raw, unprotected outer space. It's not got the geothermal activity Venus and Earth have.

That's why you can't just send a billion gallons of compressed atmosphere to Mars along with fertilizer, seeds and water; Radiation from the sun (the stuff our Ozone and other atmospheric layers protect us from) would obliterate life in about 1 hour, and the atmosphere would slowly leak away into space too.

Any smaller, like an asteroid or comet, and life would have no chance, These objects are basically violent, frozen, atmospherically defenseless and completely sterile rocks that habitually come close to a star and all but blow themselves apart before disappearing of into out space again.

Reply
 
# 18 : Saturday 16-12-2017 @ 05:23
 
 
Magnetic fields reflecting radiation seems to be a hugely important factor..
Reply
 
# 19 : Monday 18-12-2017 @ 18:56
 
 
Someone said :

We actually do know how deep the oceans are - the ocean floor was mapped in the 1960s using sonar. We even dived to the deepest spot - Mariana Trench off The Philllipines back in 1960s. But we don’t know the ocean floor in great detail - the surface of Mars is better mapped.

Undersea volcanoes have been known since the 1970s.

There's a deeper place than the Mariana trench
They haven't really explored the ocean depths
They are only mapping Greenland now
They haven't mapped Antarctica properly

Reply
 
# 20 : Monday 18-12-2017 @ 18:57
 
 
Someone said :
I watched a cool video on how, if the sun were to disappear and Earth and all the other planets were flung into Outer-space, all life on the surface would die within a few months. But micro-habitats living deep under the ocean that get there energy and oxygen from geothermic activity, would carry on living for all of eternity until it were destroyed by a cataclysmic event such as the planet getting ripped apart by a star or black hole.


The problem with that is, this only works on a celestial object the size of Earth or bigger (big enough to have geothermic activity from which to draw life giving energy). It cannot work on an asteroid or even a small planet. For example Mars is too small and has too weak a liquid core to stop the surface being constantly radioactively sterilized by the Sun and in general exposed to raw, unprotected outer space. It's not got the geothermal activity Venus and Earth have.

That's why you can't just send a billion gallons of compressed atmosphere to Mars along with fertilizer, seeds and water; Radiation from the sun (the stuff our Ozone and other atmospheric layers protect us from) would obliterate life in about 1 hour, and the atmosphere would slowly leak away into space too.

Any smaller, like an asteroid or comet, and life would have no chance, These objects are basically violent, frozen, atmospherically defenseless and completely sterile rocks that habitually come close to a star and all but blow themselves apart before disappearing of into out space again.

Ahem without the sun the earth would freeze it wouldn't be a question of months
Reply
 
# 21 : Monday 18-12-2017 @ 18:59
 
 
Newly declassified US air force film..


Video Link : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DqNNXpgB2bw
Reply
 
# 22 : Tuesday 19-12-2017 @ 00:12
 
 
Someone said :

Ahem without the sun the earth would freeze it wouldn't be a question of months

Sorry I meant humanity in that as well, as in, we could keep going for a while-een. A few months to a year.
Reply
 
Prev 12Next