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Drugs, Guns And Murder In The Capital.
 
# 61 : Saturday 13-6-2009 @ 18:59
 
 
Someone said :

I don't want this to come across as an arguement or even a debate but i would like some valid arguements from some source to keep drugs in their current state of illegality so as to sway me from my arguement to legalise them.

Deaths will decrease due to education, safehouses for heroin addicts to inject, less life threatening impurities in the substances and a lot of the time it's not the drug that kills.

It's the mix they use to dilute them.

I would worry about the signal we're sending to youngsters should narcotics be legalised.
What are we saying to the community activists who have risked their lives to keep their areas drug free? I was inclined to accept the, if not exactly legalise, then de-criminalise narcotics argument, until I met some of these activists, who said, no, at all costs, no.
I know what you're saying about organised crime etc., but I have to go with the community activists on this one, who know, at first hand, much more than I do.
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# 62 : Saturday 13-6-2009 @ 19:05
 
 
Someone said :

I would worry about the signal we're sending to youngsters should narcotics be legalised.
What are we saying to the community activists who have risked their lives to keep their areas drug free? I was inclined to accept the, if not exactly legalise, then de-criminalise narcotics argument, until I met some of these activists, who said, no, at all costs, no.
I know what you're saying about organised crime etc., but I have to go with the community activists on this one, who know, at first hand, much more than I do.

So you would prefer leave the work in the hands of vigilantes than in the law? As much as i value the work of community activists, their efforts aren't making a considerable impact on the problem. This is going to get worse and worse before they will have to sit down and think up a new strategy to deal with the worldwide drug addiction.

EDIT Don't think i'm taking a personal swipe because i am not but i think that it's old fashioned attitudes like this that have been at the helm of drug prevention policy making throught the world's governments and the evidence is around every single town, village and city in the world of how is has miserably failed.

Their policies only encouraged more crime, killings, heartache and unnecessary death.

What exactly is your arguement for keeping these drugs illegal analogue?
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# 63 : Saturday 13-6-2009 @ 19:16
 
 
UN Official Says War on Drugs Has Failed

BANGKOK—The war on drugs has been a failure and nations should take a softer approach in dealing with addicts by providing them with access to treatment and respecting their human rights, a top UN rights official said on Tuesday.

Manfred Nowak, special rapporteur on torture for the UN Human Rights Council, told The Associated Press that many countries take a punitive approach to dealing with addicts. They lump the addicts in with traffickers and have laws that sentence them to lengthy prison terms or even death with little or no access to treatment.

Singapore, for instance, canes drug users while still others deny users treatment or access to drugs in order to force confessions from them, Nowak said in a phone interview, after attending a drug policy conference in Bangkok called Harm Reduction 2009.

"We need a paradigm shift. We have to get away from a punitive approach and replace it with a human rights-based approach," Nowak said of drug policies. "As the war on terror failed, so has the war on drugs failed. We don't have less drug users and drug traffickers than when the war on drugs started in the 1980s."

He said international drug policies are among the leading causes of "human rights violations."

Nowak said there are some countries, especially in Europe and South America, that are shifting away from a punitive approach, offering needle exchange programs and drug substitutes like methadone treatment. But Nowak said many others, led by the United States, Russia and countries in Asia, continue to toe a hard line, though he hoped the US policy would change under President Barack Obama.

"These are policies that regard drug users as criminals, rather than persons who are actually in need of medical treatment," Nowak said. "In quite a number of countries particularly in Asia, prisons are overcrowded with drug offenders."

He said the slow pace of change could be seen on the UN's Commission on Narcotics Drugs in Vienna, the main UN body that deals with drug policy. He said efforts to introduce non-punitive policies and those dealing with human rights have been rejected by the Commission.

"According to the United Nations system, human rights should form an integral part of policies and that has been implemented in security, development and other areas," he said. "But not in relation to the international drug policy."

Nowak's criticism of global drug policy follows a report last month by the billionaire philanthropist George Soros' Open Society Institute, which also called for fresh thinking on the issue. The report found the tougher stand against drugs worldwide has led to a spike in rights violations, increased incarceration rates and the spread of disease without cutting down on the demand for narcotics or the numbers of people who use them.
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# 64 : Saturday 13-6-2009 @ 19:17
 
 
Someone said :

What exactly is your arguement for keeping these drugs illegal analogue?

I don't have one; I'm just sharing a thought or two. I don't know much about drugs, and I'm not sure that I'd describe community activists as vigilantes. The ones I met were decent, sincere people, and I feel they have more experience of the problem than I have, and I would respect their views in favour of any theorising from me. I was also a friend and admirer of the late Tony Gregory, and I think his heart was very much with the community activists.
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# 65 : Saturday 13-6-2009 @ 19:20
 
 
Someone said :

I don't have one; I'm just sharing a thought or two. I don't know much about drugs, and I'm not sure that I'd describe community activists as vigilantes. The ones I met were decent, sincere people, and I feel they have more experience of the problem than I have, and I would respect their views in favour of any theorising from me. I was also a friend and admirer of the late Tony Gregory, and I think his heart was very much with the community activists.

I appreciate your thoughts and i do acknowledge their harrowing work but do you think it is the answer or is it killing the problem?
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# 66 : Saturday 13-6-2009 @ 19:27
 
 
Someone said :

I appreciate your thoughts and i do acknowledge their harrowing work but do you think it is the answer or is it killing the problem?

I don't know. I do know that my amateur, middle class theorising isn't helpful, so I would like to see the Gardai, the activists, the medical professionals, the politicians and any other groups with expertise and experience of the problem engage with each other. I have no answers.
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# 67 : Monday 29-6-2009 @ 15:05
 
 
Under Glock and Key: Dutch Cops Nab 'Fatso' Mitchell With Guns

PETER 'Fatso' Mitchell, who is on the run for the murder of Veronica Guerin, was arrested in Holland on the eve of the 13th anniversary of the journalist's tragic death.

The 40-year-old drug trafficker was caught by undercover cops on Thursday while packing two deadly Glock automatic weapons (right) - the favourite tool of the Irish gangland hit man.

The Sunday World can reveal that Fatso was busted as part of a major international investigation involving the UK's Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) and Dutch police.

Unconfirmed reports also claim that his cousin and business partner, Christy ''Git' Mitchell, was in the area at the time of the dramatic arrest but got away.

It is understood that Fatso, who had to flee his bolthole in Spain after being shot as a result of a row with other drug dealers, was in custody last night in Holland.

Underworld sources are now beginning to believe that there is a hex on the gang responsible for Veronica Guerin's murder - the arrest on the eve of her anniversary came less than a week after the hitman Patrick 'Dutchy' Holland died in his sleep.

DRUG trafficker Peter 'Fatso' Mitchell, the thug who helped organise the murder of Veronica Guerin, has been busted by undercover
cops in Holland - on the eve of the 13th anniversary of the journalist's death.

The motor-mouth gangster is understood to have been arrested on Thursday night with two automatic handguns.

It is also understood that his cousin and close business partner, Christy 'Git' Mitchell, may have got away before Dutch cops swooped.

The Sunday World has learned that the violent thug was caught with two loaded Glock automatic pistols and what sources have
described as "a large amount of cash".

The international operation which led to the dramatic arrests was organised by the UK's Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA).
Probe

Peter Mitchell (right) and Christopher ‘Git’ Mitchell

Peter Mitchell (right) and Christopher ‘Git’ Mitchell

ATTACK: Peter Mitchell (right) and Christopher ‘Git’ Mitchell outside Fatso’s pub in Puerto Banus before he was forced to flee Spain
SOCA is understood to have been focusing on the links between gangs in the UK, Ireland and Holland where Mitchell has been living since he was forced to flee the Costa del Sol last year.

Fatso fell out with his business associates in Puerto Banus last summer and was shot and injured in a murder attempt.

Although details were sketchy last night it is understood that the British authorities have been in contact with the gardai to request background intelligence and the criminal records of both men.

Fatso is likely to be kept in custody while a criminal investigation continues.

This is not the first time that Mitchell has found himself on the wrong side of the law in Holland.

In November 2004 he was arrested along with his cousin, Paddy Mitchell, a brother of 'Git' Mitchell, as they were organising a shipment of drugs and guns which were destined for Ireland.

The pair were nabbed with ten kilos of cocaine, three kilos of heroin and large quantity of ammunition when cops swooped on an Amsterdam apartment.

The two thugs got a light 20 months sentence and it took the Dutch authorities more than a year to establish Mitchell's true identity - he had been using the name Anthony Swanson at the time.

However, this time it does not appear that the cops are confused about the identity of their target.

The arrest on Thursday came a week after Mitchell's father Joe was buried back in Dublin.
Jinx

Sunday World photographed Christy Mitchell as he organised the funeral and ensured that it was video taped for Fatso to watch in Holland.

Criminals are beginning to grow superstitious that all those involved in the Veronica Guerin murder have been struck with bad luck of late.

Last Friday the man who is believed to have shot the journalist dead, Dutchy Holland, died in his sleep in a prison cell in Parkhurst in the UK.

And Mitchell's arrest the night before the 13th anniversary of the murder he helped to organise has added to the hex theory.

Christy Mitchell

Christy Mitchell

TAPE: Christy Mitchell at the funeral of Fatso’s dad
In fact, Fatso has been having a very bad run of luck for the past 18 months. His close pal and business associate Paddy Mitchell also died earlier this year.

His marriage to his wife of several years, street trader Sonia Walsh, broke up.The foulmouthed mother of his two children has swapped the high life of the drug trafficker's moll in Spain for a run-down Corpo flat in central Dublin. It is understood that the coke-snorting thug regularly beat his wife and had a string of affairs with local prostitutes on the Costa.

The split -up came after Spanish police moved in and closed his bar and restaurant a month after the Sunday World published a major investigation into his activities.

Add to that the fact that he was shot and forced to leave Spain; that his dad died over a week ago and a picture begins to emerge of a hoodlum who is under intense pressure.

Another stroke of bad luck hit Mitchell last September when one his close associates Paul 'Wobbly Boots' Meehan was also busted by police in Belfast as part of another major SOCA operation.
Stroke

Meehan, who was working in conjunction with his cousin Brian 'The Tosser' Meehan - who is serving a life sentence for Veronica Guerin's murder - and Fatso Mitchell, was nabbed after organising the smuggling of a huge consignment of firearms and drugs into the country.

"It is fair to say that these scumbags are having their share of bad luck for the past 18 months, especially Fatso Mitchell," a senior source told Sunday World last night.
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# 68 : Friday 3-7-2009 @ 21:33
 
 
McDowell will be rubbing his knees with glee....Modern day internment.

Ahern denies Crime Bill is unconstitutional


Minister for Justice Dermot Ahern has defended the provisions of the new Criminal Justice Bill, which will allow the non-jury Special Criminal Court to try cases involving criminal gangs.

Opposition parties and rights organisations had criticised the time limits imposed on debating the Bill in the Dáil.

The debate on the Criminal Justice (Amendment) Bill has now ended, but Mr Ahern said extra time will be provided for consideration of the bill next week.
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Defending the measures, Mr Ahern said the Special Criminal Court was needed to deal with jury intimidation, saying it was 'absolutely unrealistic' to expect every juror in cases involving organised criminal gangs to withstand intimidation or threats.

He said any doubts he had about the measures were dispelled by listening to the family of Roy Collins, who had been threatened by Limerick gang members after his murder.

The legislation would also enable a garda of any rank with the appropriate expertise to give opinion evidence against a suspected criminal gang member.

The Bill defines a criminal gang as a group of at least three people whose main purpose or activity is serious crime.

Cuffe critical of Bill's introduction

Green Party TD Ciarán Cuffe was critical of rushing the legislation through the house and expressed doubt about using the Special Criminal Court to deal with gang-related crime

Mr Cuffe said that court is not the solution to witness intimidation as they will still have to give evidence.

Fine Gael's Charlie Flanagan also criticised the way the Bill had been introduced.

He said it was madness that the debate on it was taking place under such strict time limits.

Those criticisms have been echoed by Amnesty International and the Irish Council of Civil Liberties. The ICCL said the measures were akin to those of a police state.

Deputy Flanagan also said there should have been more consultation with Opposition parties in drawing up the measures.

And Labour's Sean Sherlock questioned if juries - as opposed to witnesses - were really being intimidated.

He also queried if the legislation would withstand a legal challenge.

His party colleague and justice spokesman Pat Rabbitte said the transfer of criminal cases to the non-jury Special Criminal Court was fundamentally dishonest.

Witness difficulties

Minister Ahern also said that as gang-related violence intensifies and becomes more ruthless, garda investigations are being hampered by the fact that witnesses were not willing to come forward.

'We cannot standby and allow the justice process to be undermined by the intimidation of witnesses and said the Bill will go some way in addressing that.'

He said there were 17 gang-related murders so far this year, compared to 16 for the whole of 2008.

Mr Ahern also told the Dáil there had been suggestions that some elements of the Bill are unconstitutional but he said the advice from the Attorney General is that there are no grounds for that belief.
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# 69 : Friday 3-7-2009 @ 22:38
 
 
I'm not against the hard line - but I'd like more debate and I'd like an assurance that the measures are temporary.

We need to clearly communicate Right and Wrong to the thugs around the country. We cannot tolerate the murder and violence we've seen far too much of.
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# 70 : Friday 3-7-2009 @ 22:42
 
 
Someone said :
I'm not against the hard line - but I'd like more debate and I'd like an assurance that the measures are temporary.

We need to clearly communicate Right and Wrong to the thugs around the country. We cannot tolerate the murder and violence we've seen far too much of.

They're going the wrong way about it Zoz. You can't introduce temporary measures like this as a solution to a problem that will remain with us for probably the rest of history.

They're relying solely on the testemonies and beliefs of members of the force, and from what i percieve to be a disregard for evidence, just trials and juries.

Nonsense.
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# 71 : Saturday 4-7-2009 @ 01:33
 
 
Also, i think for the leaders of some of these gangs like Brian Rattigan for example, jail is no obstacle to running an empire.

It's also the case for leaders of dissident movements that this would also include and the gangs in Limerick.

I think stricter monitering of prison cells and visits, technology to completeley eradicate mobile phone usage with a certain distance of a prison ground.

An overhaul of the witness protection programme would be a good start, maybe an exchange deal with another english speaking country.
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# 72 : Saturday 4-7-2009 @ 01:56
 
 
This very much mirror's what the brit's introduced in the north,
Whatever good their intentions may have been at the time,
It went down in history as one off their biggest blunders,and left the
criminal justice system in complete dissaray..
Those who don't remember the past,Are condemned to repeat it.....
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# 73 : Saturday 4-7-2009 @ 23:25
 
 
Alert at Fat Freddie home after locals report shot fired

A MAJOR security alert was sparked at the home of Dublin gangster 'Fat' Freddie Thompson -- after reports that a shot was fired at the property.

The incident occurred at the 28-year-old's home in the Maryland area of the Dublin's south inner city when locals reported hearing breaking glass at 4am.

Gardai rushed to the scene and discovered a broken front window at the property, but no trace of a bullet was found.

Officers conducted searches of the surrounding area after the incident but no sign of the perpetrators could be found.

No complaint has been received in relation to the incident, which occurred on Monday, June 15 last, it is understood.

A Garda spokesman confirmed that the residents of the property were woken and there was a report that a firearm was discharged.

Thompson's house has been targeted by underworld rivals in the past, as part of a long-running underworld dispute he is involved in with a rival criminal.

In March 2008, two men broke windows at the property when they arrived there drunk, armed with machetes, and started shouting for Thompson to "come out and face them".

After smashing the windows and failing to find Thompson, the pair went to the home of an associate of his on Bride Street and broke windows there.

INNOCENT

In a separate incident, in November 2005, a gun was placed under a vehicle -- owned by an innocent motorist -- close to Thompson's house.

Gardai believe that the placing of the sawn-off shotgun was a deliberate attempt to threaten Thompson. The find sparked an alert which led to a road in Maryland being sealed off for a period. Thompson has refused to assist gardai, it is understood.

Sources said that he had since left the country, and is believed to be staying in Rotterdam.

A security source said: "This incident is shrouded in mystery. We had the initial report of a gunshot, and there was damage to a lower window at the property, but we did not find any evidence of a bullet, or a casing at the scene.

"This property has been the scene of alerts in the past. We don't know at this point if the matter is connected to the Crumlin gang feud."
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# 74 : Sunday 5-7-2009 @ 17:20
 
 

Man dies after Dublin shooting

A man has died after he was shot last night in west Dublin.

The shooting happened at about 11.30pm last night at Oakview Way, Hartstown, a Garda statement said.

The 32-year-old man was taken to James Connolly Hospital where he died this morning.

"The scene is preserved pending a full technical examination and investigations are ongoing. No arrests have been made," the Garda statement said.

The man was shot after two cars pulled up outside his house. It is believed the victim was across the road talking to his brother and sister outside their parents' house at the time. He walked across to the two cars when a man got out and shot him with a shotgun, according to reports.

The two cars then sped away from the scene.

Gardaí are due to give further details this afternoon. The man has been identified by detectives but his name is not being released until all his family have been informed.
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# 75 : Wednesday 15-7-2009 @ 03:28
 
 
Man denies Clontarf Road murder


A 23-year-old man has gone on trial for the murder of Noel Roche, the 27-year-old man shot dead in Clontarf in Dublin three years ago.

Craig White from O'Devaney Gardens, Dublin, has denied the charge of murder.

The Central Criminal Court was told that Mr Roche was shot three times and that Mr White's DNA and fingerprints were found on a bag which contained the murder weapon.
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The Central Criminal Court was told this morning that Mr Roche was at a concert in the Point Depot on the 15 November 2005 but he left in a hurry and an hour later had been shot dead.

He was in the passenger seat in a Ford Mondeo car when four shots were fired at him on the Clontarf Road, three of which hit and killed him.

The court heard a US tourist happened to film the killing from a tour bus.

Senior Counsel Anthony Salmon told the jury that the two perpetrators were seen a short time later running from a Peugeot on nearby Furry Park Road.

In the Peugeot, gardaí found a petrol can, gloves, a balaclava and an army bag, which contained the murder weapon.

The prosecution said Mr White's finger prints were found on that bag and his DNA on the handles.

They also said his DNA was found on two gloves, which were found nearby in a bush and on the footpath.

The prosecution said Mr White was deeply involved in the killing of Mr Roche.
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