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Sign Language And Deaf Culture Thread
 
# 1 : Monday 8-12-2008 @ 22:30
 
 
This thread is for anyone interested in learning more about Deaf culture or Sign Language. Feel free to ask anything or discuss anything at all related to Deaf culture and/or sign languages.

As far as I am concerned, there is no such thing as a stupid question, so feel free to ask anything, honestly.

Cheers.

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# 2 : Monday 8-12-2008 @ 22:51
 
 
I'm waiting for a LAMH course to come up in my area. I've started using some signs I got from someone on Gumtree with my 18 month old, partially deaf daughter. I have found that a lot of them are gestures we use in every day life. For example, "all gone" I've always raised my two hand up, outwards and she copied this. I was very surprised that this was the same sign LAMH use.

The more I look into this the more iterested I find it.

She is due to ENT in Crumlin in early January to she her consultant, we already know she has very narrow ear canals and they are totally blocked. She will go under anesthetic to have these unblocked. At this stage they will most likely ask us if we want to try gromets or try her with a hearing aid. Have you any advice?

So far from probe tests and a badly failed interactive test she appears to be 100% deaf on her right side and has 60% hearing on her left.
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# 3 : Monday 8-12-2008 @ 22:54
 
 
ok here is a question, I often wondered about what is the sign language generally used in Ireland and have you got a link to it. Please thank you.
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# 4 : Monday 8-12-2008 @ 22:56
 
 
Someone said :
ok here is a question, I often wondered about what is the sign language generally used in Ireland and have you got a link to it. Please thank you.

ISL - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irish_Sign_Language

ETA: I think anyway. Intrepid will definitely know.
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# 5 : Monday 8-12-2008 @ 22:59
 
 

That is very true but there is also LAMH that works with words aswell for use by those who are partially hearing. www.lamh.org
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# 6 : Monday 8-12-2008 @ 23:00
 
 
My goodness, wikipedia really failed this time! such paucity of information!
I'll fill you in, in about 30 minutes, helping my mother with something. will give you my full attention.

thanks stewie for the link, though
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# 7 : Monday 8-12-2008 @ 23:02
 
 
Someone said :
My goodness, wikipedia really failed this time! such paucity of information!
I'll fill you in, in about 30 minutes, helping my mother with something. will give you my full attention.

thanks stewie for the link, though

That's me...the provider of links.

I don't really know a lot about it and would be interested in learning. As I said before, I took an ISL course before, but wouldn't know a lot of it.
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# 8 : Monday 8-12-2008 @ 23:05
 
 
I guess I learned IESL and not ISL, but I was getting ISL after the first couple of years. I learned with Larry Coogan (lovely lovely chap) and Eileen what's her name, who did the news etc. They were great people to learn from. But I found it very hard to learn to read.

I can still sign a fair amount of stuff - although lack of practice has made me very rusty. I had to learn double-hand for my deaf-blind friend, although some people in the Rainbow Club could just put their hand around your single hand and get everything you signed straight away. Amazing people. Really amazing people.
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# 9 : Monday 8-12-2008 @ 23:22
 
 
Someone said :
I guess I learned IESL and not ISL, but I was getting ISL after the first couple of years. I learned with Larry Coogan (lovely lovely chap) and Eileen what's her name, who did the news etc. They were great people to learn from. But I found it very hard to learn to read.

I can still sign a fair amount of stuff - although lack of practice has made me very rusty. I had to learn double-hand for my deaf-blind friend, although some people in the Rainbow Club could just put their hand around your single hand and get everything you signed straight away. Amazing people. Really amazing people.

That sounds really amazing actually, I often wondered how someone blind and deaf communicated, those it get more aggresive or faster when there is more passion in it, very much like a tone of a conversation?

I guess that is why I asked the question, I know of two sign langages, I was never sure of which was used in Ireland.

@ hex what those lamh (is that Irish for hand?)
How those that work I read the link and it seems interesting, it appears to open up communications beyond the verbal, by using movement and highlighting certain words, but I would be interested if they had a table of the 500 words or gestures they use.
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# 10 : Monday 8-12-2008 @ 23:26
 
 
Pixie, that's exactly it but they don't put the signs up on the net, you have to do the course. I have about 80 signs here, I'll copy for you if you want. Sarah is already doing some, even before we knew they were Lamh signs (Yes Irish for hand)
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# 11 : Monday 8-12-2008 @ 23:31
 
 
Someone said :
Pixie, that's exactly it but they don't put the signs up on the net, you have to do the course. I have about 80 signs here, I'll copy for you if you want. Sarah is already doing some, even before we knew they were Lamh signs (Yes Irish for hand)

Yeah I would definitly be interested, I really like this idea as an educational tool. So yes please.

So I'm assuming that the hand gesters are based on very much what we would do in hearing conversation when communicating with our hands. Actually the little I know about sign language is very similar. (yeah ok penny just drop there)
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# 12 : Monday 8-12-2008 @ 23:33
 
 
I did a Sign Language course a few years ago....problem was I had no one really to practise with...apart from a mate in work, who had learnt it in the Mormons so I never really got anyway good or fast with it....
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# 13 : Monday 8-12-2008 @ 23:34
 
 
Ok, down to business, now that I'm made sure my mother is a happy bunny. (the i miss my mother thread made me think, anyway, I digress.)

Yes, Larry Coogan and Eileen Coffey are both lovely people, Zozimus.

Here is the information in point form that Wikipedia left out as pertains to ISL. (if you want me to expand on anything at all, or even ask for sources, from the more academically minded amongst you, just ask.

Pixie Dawn, bear with me. the following information is a condensed version, believe me. Books have been written on each point I condense to a paragraph here.

* ISL started way back in 1816, when the Church of Ireland-run school, Claremont, (in Glasnevin) was set up.

*(The received wisdom is that ISL began with the establishment of the Catholic run Cabra schools, but... no.) St Mary's school for Deaf Girls was set up in 1845, and run by the Dominician Nuns. They borrowed signs from LSF (French Sign Language, from Caen in France) and BSL (British Sign Language, and adapted it for Irish use. for instance, the female sign variation for Friday takes the V handshape. V for Vendedri, French for Friday.

* Female Sign variation? Yes, there are plenty of sign variations within ISL. When St Joseph's, the school for Deaf boys were set up, it was felt that the signs as used for the girls were too feminine for the boys to use, so the christian brothers went to America, where they picked up ASL and to Britain, where they picked up BSL. Then the male sign variation was used amongst the christian brothers.

* Other sign variations: generational sign variations, gay sign variation, regional sign variations.

* ISL is not dependent on the spoken word as it has its own grammar, structure and vocabulary. That is the difference between it and LAMH, which Hex points out that some people use as a support system for people who can hear a bit. Most Deaf people do not use LAMH, but ISL.

*If you want to learn sign language, no need to freak out with all the variations, you will be ok.

GRIN.
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# 14 : Monday 8-12-2008 @ 23:44
 
 
Someone said :

She is due to ENT in Crumlin in early January to she her consultant, we already know she has very narrow ear canals and they are totally blocked. She will go under anesthetic to have these unblocked. At this stage they will most likely ask us if we want to try gromets or try her with a hearing aid. Have you any advice?

I'm not a medical professional. Having said this...

From my personal experience of using hearing aids when I was growing up, and from accounts from hearing friends who risked permanent deafness trying on my hearing aids, hearing aids do not accurately reflect what most people hear. To quote my friend, it's hearing sound through a machine, it's just not the same. The sound is distorted. I have no idea what she is talking about, but I'm sure you do? The hearing aid batteries need to be replaced a lot. I do know that if your daughter goes to a deaf school, batteries and hearing aids are free, but if she goes to a mainstream school,I am not sure they are free? They can be pretty expensive. I suggest you ask your visiting teacher and or other professionals about this.

Alternatively, you could try the grommet. However, the grommet only works for children who are deaf due to blocked ears. clear the ears and they can hear again. Ask yourself what kind of deafness does your daughter have? I have a feeling it is more than just blocked ears, to be honest, and hence a hearing aid may be needed.

Try the simplest step first. The grommet. After that, you can decide.
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# 15 : Monday 8-12-2008 @ 23:46
 
 
Someone said :
Ok, down to business, now that I'm made sure my mother is a happy bunny. (the i miss my mother thread made me think, anyway, I digress.)

Yes, Larry Coogan and Eileen Coffey are both lovely people, Zozimus.

Here is the information in point form that Wikipedia left out as pertains to ISL. (if you want me to expand on anything at all, or even ask for sources, from the more academically minded amongst you, just ask.

Pixie Dawn, bear with me. the following information is a condensed version, believe me. Books have been written on each point I condense to a paragraph here.

* ISL started way back in 1816, when the Church of Ireland-run school, Claremont, (in Glasnevin) was set up.

*(The received wisdom is that ISL began with the establishment of the Catholic run Cabra schools, but... no.) St Mary's school for Deaf Girls was set up in 1845, and run by the Dominician Nuns. They borrowed signs from LSF (French Sign Language, from Caen in France) and BSL (British Sign Language, and adapted it for Irish use. for instance, the female sign variation for Friday takes the V handshape. V for Vendedri, French for Friday.

* Female Sign variation? Yes, there are plenty of sign variations within ISL. When St Joseph's, the school for Deaf boys were set up, it was felt that the signs as used for the girls were too feminine for the boys to use, so the christian brothers went to America, where they picked up ASL and to Britain, where they picked up BSL. Then the male sign variation was used amongst the christian brothers.

* Other sign variations: generational sign variations, gay sign variation, regional sign variations.

* ISL is not dependent on the spoken word as it has its own grammar, structure and vocabulary. That is the difference between it and LAMH, which Hex points out that some people use as a support system for people who can hear a bit. Most Deaf people do not use LAMH, but ISL.

*If you want to learn sign language, no need to freak out with all the variations, you will be ok.

GRIN.

Wow, firstly thanks Interipd, secondly people will you stop genderising things please. ( if makes my life more difficult)

So if I was to learn a sign language which would be the best? (I surpose if I want to communicate with someone through sign it would be the language they use) so yeah that makkes sense to me now, different dialects, different mannerisms, different jargon all to do with a social group. It very similar to english then, in it make up.
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