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Understanding Mental Illness
 
# 181 : Thursday 11-11-2010 @ 20:25
 
 
Someone said :

You would be surprised to know how wrong you are.
Try a waiting list of anywhere between three and twelve months, depending on HSE sector.
If your lucky .

Worked for me. Although I did pay 100 quid a go to the shrink but I got my drugs free.

This was in 2005 though when the country still had money.
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# 182 : Thursday 11-11-2010 @ 20:33
 
 
I suppose you were fortunate that you could pay or find the means to pay.

There are so many that don't have access to cash to pay for themselves.
That's why the doors to our acute units are revolving, When they are discharged there is no follow up therapy available and it's only a matter of WHEN they are admitted again.
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# 183 : Thursday 11-11-2010 @ 20:40
 
 
What happens if you are admitted to hospital after self harming or attempting suicide? Do you not see a Psychiatrist then?
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# 184 : Thursday 11-11-2010 @ 20:43
 
 
Someone said :
What happens if you are admitted to hospital after self harming or attempting suicide? Do you not see a Psychiatrist then?

I would assume that verbalising that you are about to self harm and presenting showing physical signs are totally different and are treated as such.
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# 185 : Thursday 11-11-2010 @ 20:47
 
 
Not necessarily you get put on meds, then you wait to get into the system.

The problem with psych services is the stigma, because of the stigma you don't get a lot of sufferers coming forward to form pressure groups, so resources are aloud to be diminished without that public uproar.

If it was say cancer or heart trouble its all over Joe Duffy, but you seldom hear about mental illness. Its not perceived as a debilitating deteriorating life threatening disease.

That's just my opinion.

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# 186 : Thursday 11-11-2010 @ 20:52
 
 
Someone said :
What happens if you are admitted to hospital after self harming or attempting suicide? Do you not see a Psychiatrist then?

You would see a crisis nurse and a psychiatrist during the admittance process alright.
It is not unusual to be discharged later on that very same day with a prescription and an appointment with the local day hospital in a fortnights time.
The day hospital will just continue to re-issue the prescription while waiting months to actually talk to a professional .
That is the normal operation of the HSE in todays Ireland.
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# 187 : Thursday 11-11-2010 @ 20:54
 
 
I remember when I was ill my doctor used to give me sick notes with things like Urinary Tract Infections, my employer had to be told in the end but what I did notice is that they still treated it like it wasn't a real illness, I still got written warnings despite actually having notes from doctors saying that I wasn't fit for work. I remember thinking at the time if I had a physical illness none of that stuff would have happened.
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# 188 : Thursday 11-11-2010 @ 20:55
 
 
How would you get Paranoid Personality Disorder diagnosed, how would you know you suffered from it?
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# 189 : Thursday 11-11-2010 @ 20:55
 
 
Someone said :

You would see a crisis nurse and a psychiatrist during the admittance process alright.
It is not unusual to be discharged later on that very same day with a prescription and an appointment with the local day hospital in a fortnights time.
The day hospital will just continue to re-issue the prescription while waiting months to actually talk to a professional .
That is the normal operation of the HSE in todays Ireland.

That happened to me but that was only because my parents were taking me home if they weren't I would have been admitted to St. Itas.
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# 190 : Sunday 9-1-2011 @ 04:00
 
 
I thought i would bump this thread as we seem to have gone of topic on another thread.

It is my belief that stigma and the notions carried with it are very hurtful and quiet often is the cause of many people now wanting to address their illness.
Mental illness can develop in any one of us,it has no age or gender barrier.
Some people may experience very minor symptoms which may effect how they deal with themselves and others in a way that is not obvious to others.
Others are not quiet so lucky and their illness may develop in such a way that their actions are quiet damaging to themselves and to others.
When this happens and other people get hurt it is very easy for society to immediatly
label this individual as something other than a person with a mental illness.
Words such as psycho, whackjob, nutjob etc.....
Maybe it is because we are so angry at the actions of that individual that we do not want to acknowledge that they have an illness which caused them to carry out their actions in the first place. Anger is a reaction to an action and we all experience this emotion.
Even through our anger we must not loose sight that the action of the individual was
as a result of their illness.
We can not justify the action but we must recognise the power that caused it.
That power being, A mental illness which the individual was experiencing at that given time.
So while we reject the action of the indivudual, Let us not label that person with stigmatic slang.
In doing so we are giving a label to every person who experiences mental illness at some time or other in their life.

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# 191 : Sunday 9-1-2011 @ 09:33
 
 
thankfully no one in my family or friends suffer with this ailment. i would agree it iswrong to class them as a nut job or whacko. they are sick and have no control over their actions.
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# 192 : Tuesday 11-1-2011 @ 15:03
 
 
Amnesty International Ireland, in partnership with See Change, cordially invite you to attend First Fortnight, a lively day of events to highlight the issue of mental health prejudice and discrimination in The Button Factory, Temple Bar on Saturday 15 January 2011 from 1.30 pm.

Talk @ First Fortnight (1.30pm to 3.00pm)

" Have attitudes and behaviours towards people with mental health
problems really changed?"

Challenge mental health prejudice and discrimination by joining us for a lively and engaging discussion.

Panellists include:
Colm O’Gorman Executive Director, Amnesty International Ireland
Colm Tóibín Award winning author
Liam Hayes GAA star, journalist and author
Siobhan Barry Consultant Psychitrist, College of Psychiatry of Ireland
Plus special guests

This event is free. To reserve your place please RSVP to mentalhealth@amnesty.ie
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# 193 : Tuesday 11-1-2011 @ 15:17
 
 
Im going to the gig later, it looks like it will be good.
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# 194 : Tuesday 11-1-2011 @ 17:06
 
 
It's a year to the day since I went into psychiatric hospital. Where has the time gone?
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# 195 : Friday 6-5-2011 @ 03:32
 
 
Seems that stigma still prevents people from accessing mental health services.

JAMIE SMYTH, Social Affairs Correspondent

ALMOST HALF of people suffering from mental health problems such as depression do not seek professional help due mainly to the high cost of counselling and the stigma associated with seeking professional help, a new survey shows.

The survey, which is published today by Amárach Consulting, shows just over three-quarters of Irish people know someone who has suffered from mental health vulnerabilities over the past year.

Depression is the most common cause of mental health problems (38 per cent) in individuals followed by: bereavement (26 per cent); stress related issues (21 per cent); alcohol or drug addiction (15 per cent); bullying (8 per cent); and emotional abuse (7 per cent).

Just under half of people who are suffering mental health problems or know a close friend or family member with mental health problems sought counselling (49 per cent), says the survey.

The survey finds those people most exposed to the impact of the economic downturn in society – people from lower social class groups – are less likely than those in higher social class groups to seek counselling. Some 53 per cent of professionals in the ABC1 class category seek professional counselling compared to 46 per cent of those in the category of C2DE.

There are significant geographic differences in the number of people who sought counselling to treat mental health problems. Some 48 per cent of people in Dublin sought help; 50 per cent of people in Leinster; 58 per cent in Munster; and 37 per cent in Connacht.

The survey concludes people in Connacht seem more resistant to the concept of counselling compared to those in other regions.

Some 52 per cent of men say they are open to the concept of counselling compared to 66 per cent of women. Older people are also more open to seeking professional help compared to younger people.

The survey shows the cost of counselling is the main barrier to seeking professional help, with 58 per cent of people. Other barriers to seeking help are: stigma (46 per cent); availability (29 per cent); confidentiality (15 per cent); lack of privacy (12 per cent); and a difficulty in talking about problems (2 per cent).

The survey is published by Amárach Consulting to coincide with the launch today of a support programme by Beacon of Light – a Clondalkin-based family support and counselling organisation.

The survey is based on interviews with a nationally representative sample of some 1,000 people.

Amárach Consulting is co-ordinating the support programme, which aims to raise €50,000 and get volunteer support for Beacon of Light from firms and staff based in the Citywest business campus.

Orla Murphy, director of Amárach Research, said the survey showed the openness of people to availing of counselling services is extremely positive.

“However the role of stigma as a barrier to counselling is one that is particularly relevant for consideration by the wider community and by the media.”

In difficult economic times, the demand for counselling and support services will rise just as Government’s ability to meet this demand declines.

“Our initiative is an attempt to bridge the funding gap for Beacon of Light by engaging with our corporate neighbours and colleagues here in Citywest and the wider hinterland over the next 12 months,” said Ms Murphy
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