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Understanding Mental Illness
 
# 61 : Wednesday 13-1-2010 @ 18:07
 
 
Ok. I got this from 'psychiatric disorders .com

Living with Schizophrenia:
Psychotherapy and Schizophrenia Recovery
Living with schizophrenia is an ongoing challenge for both schizophrenic and their families. Complete schizophrenia recovery is rare: The majority of patients will be living with schizophrenia side effects and residual symptoms for the rest of their lives. Psychotherapy, maintaining antipsychotic medication and family support are all necessary for schizophrenia recovery.
Schizophrenia Recovery Rates
While antipsychotic medications are the best treatments for people living with schizophrenia, recovery rates vary widely. Schizophrenia studies indicate one-third of all patients' psychosis improve enough with treatment to qualify as schizophrenia recovery. An additional third of all cases improve with treatment, but continue living with some schizophrenia psychotic symptoms. The remaining third do not respond well to antipsychotics, and continue to experience schizophrenia psychosis.
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# 62 : Wednesday 13-1-2010 @ 20:26
 
 
Getting some great feedback on this thread,Thanks.

Here is a little quiz which may raise debate with the answers.
I will post the correct results tomorrow.


1. A person may be admitted to an Approved Centre because there is a serious likelihood of that person causing immediate and serious harm to himself / herself or others. True False

2. Mental illness, severe dementia or significant intellectual disability is sufficient in themselves for a person to have a mental disorder. True False

3. A person with a mental illness likely to cause immediate serious harm to themselves fits the definition of mental disorder. True False

4. A person may be admitted to an Approved Centre if it is likely to benefit their condition. True False

5. If a person is not able to judge for themselves that treatment in an Approved Centre would benefit their condition, they have a mental disorder. True False

6. A person with a signifcant intellectual disability, who can’t get appropriate treatment unless admitted, and if admitted the treatment will beneift their condition to a material extent fits the definition of mental disorder.
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# 63 : Wednesday 13-1-2010 @ 20:30
 
 
Looking forward to seeing the correct answers tomorrow. Here is my response at the moment, rightly or wrongly.

1. True
2. false
3. True
4. False
5. False
6. False
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# 64 : Wednesday 13-1-2010 @ 20:35
 
 
OK - here's a little addition to this thread to provide some food for thought.

I admitted myself to a psychiatric hospital this week due to my own severe anxiety problems. And I can tell you, it's really opened my eyes to mental illness. Most of the patients on my ward are the nicest, most decent individuals who need help, as I do. It's astounding and saddening to think that so much ignorance, misunderstanding and stigma is still attached to mental health.
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# 65 : Wednesday 13-1-2010 @ 20:41
 
 
Someone said :
OK - here's a little addition to this thread to provide some food for thought.

I admitted myself to a psychiatric hospital this week due to my own severe anxiety problems. And I can tell you, it's really opened my eyes to mental illness. Most of the patients on my ward are the nicest, most decent individuals who need help, as I do. It's astounding and saddening to think that so much ignorance, misunderstanding and and stigma is still attched to mental health.

A friend of mine admitted himself in the 80's and was told to get out before he became like what was in there - he bragged for years that he had a piece of paper stating that he was sane... more than what most people can claim.
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# 66 : Wednesday 13-1-2010 @ 20:42
 
 
unfortunately JK ignorance is so widespread in relation to mental illness. anyway i wish you all the best with your programme in hospital. its a brave step to take and even braver to share it with everyone. good luck.
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# 67 : Wednesday 13-1-2010 @ 21:23
 
 
Someone said :
OK - here's a little addition to this thread to provide some food for thought.

I admitted myself to a psychiatric hospital this week due to my own severe anxiety problems. And I can tell you, it's really opened my eyes to mental illness. Most of the patients on my ward are the nicest, most decent individuals who need help, as I do. It's astounding and saddening to think that so much ignorance, misunderstanding and stigma is still attached to mental health.

Thinking of you JK and wishing you the very best. You are right in you statement that ignorance stigma and misunderstanding are the most common reactions to issues around mental health.
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# 68 : Wednesday 13-1-2010 @ 21:30
 
 
I don't know if i've a mental illness or disorder. And it doesn't matter. I do get depressed sometimes. How badly. I don't really know. Maybe some would say I just have the blues. Ones at work noticed me being blue one day. And I couldn't hide it.
But I'm seeing someone. Just knowing that there is someone'there'. is enough to let me get on with my day.
He's my lifeline.
I'm just grateful every day.
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# 69 : Wednesday 13-1-2010 @ 21:54
 
 
Good luck Jupiterkid, we're all behind you.
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# 70 : Wednesday 13-1-2010 @ 21:57
 
 
Fair play to you JK for sharing this with us. And fair play for taking the first step of action.
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# 71 : Wednesday 13-1-2010 @ 22:09
 
 
Jk. Wishing you a speedy recovery.
I was told the hardest thing i had to do was walk through the door of the hospital
and the rest of my recovery would get easier as the days went by.
They were right.
I made some very good friends during my stay in hospital, and to this day we continue to contact each other and to give support.
The best way for understanding of mental health issues is through education, and you have certainly helped that issue by posting here tonight.
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# 72 : Thursday 14-1-2010 @ 00:05
 
 
Someone said :
OK - here's a little addition to this thread to provide some food for thought.

I admitted myself to a psychiatric hospital this week due to my own severe anxiety problems. And I can tell you, it's really opened my eyes to mental illness. Most of the patients on my ward are the nicest, most decent individuals who need help, as I do. It's astounding and saddening to think that so much ignorance, misunderstanding and stigma is still attached to mental health.

P. S. Apologies to Marlbo for spelling his name "marlbro"

JK,
Good luck and wishes for the best of health to you.
The saddest part about ignorance and fear that I see is many of Jeff's peers that knew him before he was ill as well as after his recovery, still avoid him. It's heartbreaking to bump into someone he knows in the supermarket and see them virtually run away ASAP.
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# 73 : Thursday 14-1-2010 @ 02:24
 
 
I'm not sure where i came across this piece,
But it does give some insight into how one is feeling when unwell.

PLEASE HEAR WHAT I'M NOT SAYING.

Don't be fooled by me. Don't be fooled by the face I wear.
For I wear a mask, a thousand masks, masks that I'm afraid to take off, and none of them is me. Pretending is an art that's second nature with me, but don't be fooled. For God's sake, don't be fooled.
I give you the impression that I'm secure, that all is sunny and unruffled with me, within as well as without, that confidence is my name and coolness my game, that the water's calm and I'm in command, and that I need no one. But don't believe me. My surface may seem smooth but my surface is my mask, ever varying and ever concealing.
Beneath lies no complacency, only lies, confusion, fear and aloneness. But I hide this. I don't want anybody to know it.
I panic at the thought of my weakness and fear being exposed. That's why I frantically create a mask to hide behind, a nonchalant sophisticated facade, to help me pretend, to shield me from the glance that knows. But such a glance is precisely my salvation. My only hope and I know it. That is, if it's followed by acceptance, if it's followed by love. It's the only thing that can liberate me from myself, from my own self-built prison walls, from the barriers I so painstakingly erect. It's the only thing that will assure me of what I can't assure myself, that I'm really worth something.
But I don't tell you this, I don't dare, I'm afraid to. I'm afraid your glance will not be followed by acceptance, will not be followed by love. I'm afraid you'll think less of me, that you'll laugh and your laugh would kill me. I'm afraid that deep-down I'm nothing, that I'm just no good, and that you will see this and reject me.
So I play my game, my desperate pretending game, with a facade of assurance without and a trembling child within. So begins the glittering but empty parade of masks, and my life becomes a front. I idly chatter to you in the suave tones of surface talk. I tell you everything that's really nothing, and nothing of what's everything, of what's crying within me. So when I'm going through my routine, do not be fooled by what I'm saying. Please listen carefully and try to hear what I'm not saying, what I'd like to be able to say, what for survival I need to say, but what I can't say.
I don't like to hide. I don't like to play superficial phony games. I want to stop playing them. I want to be genuine and spontaneous and me, but you've got to help me. You've got to hold out your hand even when that's the last thing I seem to want. Only you can wipe away from my eyes the blank stare of the breathing dead. Only you can call me into aliveness. Each time you're kind and gentle and encouraging, each time you try to understand because you really care, my heart begins to grow wings, very small wings, very feeble wings, but wings! With your power to touch me into feeling, you can breathe life into me. I want you to know that.
I want you to know how important you are to me, how you can be a creator -- a honest-to-God creator -- of the person that is me, if you choose to. You alone can break down the wall behind which I tremble, you alone can remove my mask, you alone can release me from my shadow-world of panic and uncertainty, from my lonely prison, if you choose to. Please choose to. Do not pass me by. It will not be easy for you.
A long conviction of worthlessness builds strong walls. The nearer you approach to me the blinder I may strike back. It's irrational, but despite what the books say about man, often I am irrational. I fight against the very thing that I cry out for. But I am told that love is stronger than strong walls, and in this lies my hope. Please try to beat down those walls with firm hands, but with gentle hands, for a child is very sensitive.
Who am I, you may wonder? I am someone you know very well. For I am every man you meet, and I am every woman you meet.
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# 74 : Thursday 14-1-2010 @ 11:42
 
 
Lovely piece.
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# 75 : Thursday 14-1-2010 @ 14:46
 
 
ah thats brilliant.
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