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Foreign Films
 
# 61 : Tuesday 11-1-2011 @ 13:33
 
 
I remember watching a porno when one of my mates bought a new fan-dangled high tech video recorder, the film was in Dutch with Arab subtitles I couldn't understand the plot of the film at all, we would fast forward the dirty bits to get back to the story and to say the least the tracking was totally off.

Dubbing doesn't work for me, its annoying, although I don't understand the language of a foreign language film, I understand the acting and expression, dubbing takes the performance away. It takes the film out of sync.
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# 62 : Tuesday 11-1-2011 @ 13:34
 
 
I think dubbing is a question of culture but also of market.

In France (leader in the art of dubbing), Germany or Spain, dubbing is mostly for English speaking films, or films from one of the other countries.
They are very marketable films, so to reach the mass audience, dubbing is needed.

And for the "Cinema d'art et d'essai" (arty films) niche, there are some venues that will offer the same films, undubbed, for an extra fee.

It will be rare that a mass appeal film comes from a non-English-speaking country tot he Irish market.
And when it does, it may just not be worth dubbing it. It makes more financial sense to subtitle.

That is why the English-speaking countries tend to have a sub-title culture (with exceptions), while the non-English speaking countries tend to have a dubbing culture (with exceptions, especially for the niche I mentionned).

It goes to the extent that a number of French film have been shot in English, and then dubbed in French by the actors themselves, so that they could have an international career without subtitles!
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# 63 : Tuesday 11-1-2011 @ 13:49
 
 
Someone said :
I think dubbing is a question of culture but also of market.

In France (leader in the art of dubbing), Germany or Spain, dubbing is mostly for English speaking films, or films from one of the other countries.
They are very marketable films, so to reach the mass audience, dubbing is needed.

And for the "Cinema d'art et d'essai" (arty films) niche, there are some venues that will offer the same films, undubbed, for an extra fee.

It will be rare that a mass appeal film comes from a non-English-speaking country tot he Irish market.
And when it does, it may just not be worth dubbing it. It makes more financial sense to subtitle.

That is why the English-speaking countries tend to have a sub-title culture (with exceptions), while the non-English speaking countries tend to have a dubbing culture (with exceptions, especially for the niche I mentionned).

It goes to the extent that a number of French film have been shot in English, and then dubbed in French by the actors themselves, so that they could have an international career without subtitles!

Interesting
And maybe its I am so use to subs they don't bother me at all. I also hate foreign language book translations, but its a case of having to bare them as I can only speak English.

But in lit you can get good translation and bad ones, I imagine its the same for dubbing.
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# 64 : Tuesday 11-1-2011 @ 13:52
 
 
Someone said :
It goes to the extent that a number of French film have been shot in English, and then dubbed in French by the actors themselves, so that they could have an international career without subtitles!

This happens quite a lot, Italy have been doing it for decades.
The Spaghetti Westerns tended to be shot in several languages, being Italian/American productions it was not expected that the cast should speak both languages and throwing Mexicans into the mix ment that there were often 3 languages filmed and dubbed over later depending what country they were being shown in.
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# 65 : Tuesday 11-1-2011 @ 13:54
 
 
Someone said :

Interesting
And maybe its I am so use to subs they don't bother me at all. I also hate foreign language book translations, but its a case of having to bare them as I can only speak English.

But in lit you can get good translation and bad ones, I imagine its the same for dubbing.

Subtitles can be more painful when you actualy speak the language.
I tend to read the English subtitles of French films, and thus I do not actaully listen.
I only went to see 8 Women (8 femmes) at the cinemas because the trailer deviously suggested the films would be in English.
But I suppose that the dubbing in English is so bad, that it is unpleasurable. It is bad because they have little experience, due to the limited market.

Countries like Germany and French are world-class experts in dubbing: they know how to adapt translations so as to synch the sounds and the mouth movements, without loosing too much of the meaning.
When it is well done, it is actually more enjoyable, especially for the "mass market", for which relaxing and switching off is often (not always) a motivation for going to the movies.
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# 66 : Tuesday 11-1-2011 @ 13:56
 
 
Someone said :

This happens quite a lot, Italy have been doing it for decades.
The Spaghetti Westerns tended to be shot in several languages, being Italian/American productions it was not expected that the cast should speak both languages and throwing Mexicans into the mix ment that there were often 3 languages filmed and dubbed over later depending what country they were being shown in.

It is quite different: in this case they intend from the strat to use one language only.
They do not do it because of a technical limitation.
They do it because they want to have it done like that, and they can end-up rejecting (good) actors whose language ethics collide with the concept.
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# 67 : Tuesday 11-1-2011 @ 13:57
 
 
I watched "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" the other night with the sprogs. It was in English and subtitled in English. It was incredibly annoying as I kept reading the subtitles instead of watching the movie proper. Plus I noticed all the mistakes they made in the subtitles and how they didn't pick up on the nuances of the movie.
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# 68 : Tuesday 11-1-2011 @ 14:10
 
 
Someone said :
I watched "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" the other night with the sprogs. It was in English and subtitled in English. It was incredibly annoying as I kept reading the subtitles instead of watching the movie proper. Plus I noticed all the mistakes they made in the subtitles and how they didn't pick up on the nuances of the movie.

Which is a limitation that dubbing can transcend.
A dubbed film is just another version of the film: you are invited to a new experience, diregarding the original voices and words.
A subtitled film can be a perpetual race to catch up, and when yuo do it can be a frustration. But it does no have to be.

That is why I like when there are two versions on offer: one properly dubbed, one subtitled.
And because this is very unlikely to be the case in Ireland, due to the dire state of the dubbing industry... foreign-language films are usually best enjoyed subtitled... in Ireland in 2011.
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# 69 : Tuesday 11-1-2011 @ 14:12
 
 
Imagine is Ros na Rún was dubbed
Imagine if French films were subtitled as Gaeilge. Even on TG4 they have not dared that one, that I know of.
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# 70 : Tuesday 11-1-2011 @ 14:16
 
 
Someone said :

It is quite different: in this case they intend from the strat to use one language only.

Yes i know its different, i was just offering a related story. I should have made that more obvious.

Its strange how some movies have never been subtitled.
Withnail & I is a perfect example, only recently did the new special edition blu ray come out and there is still no sign of Subs. This amazes me, I'm sure that foreign audiences, even English speaking, struggle with the accents at times and I'm sure the deaf community would love to follow it.
I remember coming across a set of Subs someone had made but they were terrible, out of sync, spelling mistakes, even whole lines of dialogue missing.
Maybe i should just make one myself.
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# 71 : Sunday 27-3-2011 @ 21:07
 
 
I have been following a Danish detective series "The Killing" on BBC4. I just watched the last episode and I have to say it was up there with "The Wire" and "Sopranos" it was that good.

It was a smash hit on the continent but HBO are remaking it in English and basing the story in America. Its the usual story of a woman cop in a male dominated world but "Lund" is something different her pure lack of womanly mannerisms, no make up for the whole series but yet sexy, but that is made irrelevant, as it has nothing to do with her job.

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# 72 : Sunday 27-3-2011 @ 21:10
 
 
Someone said :
I have been following a Danish detective series "The Killing" on BBC4. I just watched the last episode and I have to say it was up there with "The Wire" and "Sopranos" it was that good.

It was a smash hit on the continent but HBO are remaking it in English and basing the story in America. Its the usual story of a woman cop in a male dominated world but "Lund" is something different her pure lack of womanly mannerisms, no make up for the whole series but yet sexy, but that is made irrelevant, as it has nothing to do with her job.


That sounds good. When was it on BBC4?
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# 73 : Sunday 27-3-2011 @ 21:11
 
 
Mr Bin was telling me about this at the meet. It did seem interesting.
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# 74 : Sunday 27-3-2011 @ 21:24
 
 
Unfortunately the last episodes was on last night. The directer somehow make some of the scenes look like postcards or paintings, this is the trailer.

JevPKFXNwGE

And this is the uncompromising Lund, she is no Jane Tennyson.

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Well worth catching if another channel puts it out.
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# 75 : Monday 28-3-2011 @ 00:33
 
 
The Killing was brilliant. It had me gripped for all twenty episodes. The most enjoyable thing I've watched since The Wire.

I'm sure BBC4 will repeat it. Otherwise, you can torrent it - use "Forbrydelsen" as a search term with "The Killing".
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