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Goodbye Belgium?
 
# 1 : Monday 14-6-2010 @ 05:11
 
 
Following the results of the national elections in Belgium and hot on the heels of their ban on the burqua, it looks like the country is heading down the road to splitting into two: the wealthy, Dutch speaking Flanders in the North and the poorer French speaking Wallonia in the South. Complicating matters is the capital Brussels - even though geographically it lies just inside Flanders, the city is predominantly French speaking.

So will anyone lament or even care if Belgium goes the way of Czechoslovakia?
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# 2 : Monday 14-6-2010 @ 08:33
 
 
Not at all. About time they did it, it just doesn't work.

Hope they split up asap.
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# 3 : Monday 14-6-2010 @ 17:06
 
 
Well, the pro-separatist party won the popular vote in the Flanders region of Belgium, but the overall majority went to a Walloon supported "socialist" party. It looks that Belgium won't be able to hold itself together for too much longer, with the way things are going.

It seems language unites or divides a people more than religion or culture these days. However, Switzerland has four language regions and seems to do just fine.

And if Belgium does break up, it will reignite debate on other parts of Western European countries with separatist leanings, such as Scotland in the UK, Catalonia and the Basque Region in Spain, Corsica in France and even perhaps the Peoples Rebublic of Cork here!
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# 4 : Monday 14-6-2010 @ 17:08
 
 
Not to forget the North as well, though thats a longshot.
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# 5 : Monday 14-6-2010 @ 17:10
 
 
Someone said :
Well, the pro separatist party won the popular vote in the Flanders region of Brlgium, but the overall majority went to a Walloon supported "socialist" party. It looks that Belgium won't be able to hold itself together for too much longer, with the way things are going.

It seems language unites or divides a people more than religion or culture these days. However, Swtizerland has four language regions and seems to do just fine.

And if Belgium does break up, it will reignite debate on other parts of Western European countries with separatist leanings, such as Scotland in the UK, Catalonia and the Basque Region in Spain, Corsica in France and even perhaps the Peoples Rebublic of Cork here!

Personally can't wait to see Spain ripped to pieces....
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# 6 : Monday 14-6-2010 @ 17:13
 
 
Could it be the first crack to show in europe's arse?
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# 7 : Monday 14-6-2010 @ 17:16
 
 
Mama Corsica (Eurovision)

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# 8 : Monday 14-6-2010 @ 17:18
 
 
I think it is pathetic.
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# 9 : Monday 14-6-2010 @ 17:24
 
 
Someone said :
Well, the pro separatist party won the popular vote in the Flanders region of Brlgium, but the overall majority went to a Walloon supported "socialist" party. It looks that Belgium won't be able to hold itself together for too much longer, with the way things are going.

It seems language unites or divides a people more than religion or culture these days. However, Swtizerland has four language regions and seems to do just fine.

And if Belgium does break up, it will reignite debate on other parts of Western European countries with separatist leanings, such as Scotland in the UK, Catalonia and the Basque Region in Spain, Corsica in France and even perhaps the Peoples Rebublic of Cork here!

China has many dialects India has even more, and there is lot of internal strife in these countries, they are not as united as we are led to believe. Interestingly enough although China has many dialects, but they can all read the same Chinese script a legacy from Chin the founder of China.

You are right about Cork noone but themselves can understand what they are saying, so on your way Cork
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# 10 : Monday 14-6-2010 @ 17:37
 
 
This map shows how Belgium is divided linguisitcally. Flanders is the orange part in the North where the language is Flemish which is essentially similar to Dutch. The red region in the south is the French speaking Wallonia. Brussels is the small area in the middle with the diagonal stripes.

Interestingly, many people forget that there is a German speaking part of Belgium in its far East, along the border with Germany. It's the small green area to the right.

Brussels is odd - many people think it's located right along the linguistic boundary, but it's actually just inside the Flanders region. However, even though Brussels is officially billingual, French is very much the lingua franca in this city.


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# 11 : Monday 14-6-2010 @ 19:35
 
 
It seems that the general consensus among my Belgian friends is that the two regions will become more autonomous but they will not break up and become more federal than anything else.
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# 12 : Monday 14-6-2010 @ 19:37
 
 
A sort of commonwealth might work, dunno.

they're two separate countries anyway, just under the same state.
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# 13 : Monday 14-6-2010 @ 20:35
 
 
Just think of their increased chances of winning Eurovision if they do split....
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# 14 : Tuesday 15-6-2010 @ 00:02
 
 
Does anyone else thing that there is a real irony is the increasing direction Belgium is moving - fragmentation and a split - when its capital city Brussels holds the administrative centre of the European Union?

Actually, some Flemish blame the location of Brussels as the capital of the EU and the centre of most of its institutions since the 1960s as a big factor in its "Frenchification." Also immigration to Brussels from outside Europe - particularly from Morocco, Algeria and Belgium's former colony the Congo - has increased its French speaking majority.
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# 15 : Tuesday 15-6-2010 @ 00:10
 
 
When I was in Brussels I saw many immigrants from The Maghreb. The southwestern part of the city is like stepping into Tunis or somewhere! (I'm saying this in a neutral tone, BTW).

Some Flemings I spoke to in Flanders said they'd be happy to unite with Holland. However, the prevailing desire there seems to be simply independence for Flanders. My friends there refer to their language as 'Dutch' and they were of the opinion that it's generally only really nationalists in Flanders who call it 'Flemish'.

The stumbling block does seem to be Brussels. I can see a federated Belgium in the future, where it's effectively two separate states but just under one Crown and a federal capital, Brussels.
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