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Science Is Great
 
# 61 : Monday 17-1-2011 @ 13:15
 
 
Yay science.....I totally want a wooly mammoth for a pet
http://www.rte.ie/news/2011/0117/mammoth.html
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# 62 : Thursday 22-9-2011 @ 22:37
 
 
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-15017484## Speed-of-light experiments give baffling result at Cern Puzzling results from Cern, home of the LHC, have confounded physicists - because it appears subatomic particles have exceeded the speed of light.

Neutrinos sent through the ground from Cern toward the Gran Sasso laboratory 732km away seemed to show up a tiny fraction of a second early.

The result - which threatens to upend a century of physics - will be put online for scrutiny by other scientists.

In the meantime, the group says it is being very cautious about its claims.

"We tried to find all possible explanations for this," said report author Antonio Ereditato of the Opera collaboration.

"We wanted to find a mistake - trivial mistakes, more complicated mistakes, or nasty effects - and we didn't," he told BBC News.

"When you don't find anything, then you say 'Well, now I'm forced to go out and ask the community to scrutinise this.'"
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# 63 : Thursday 22-9-2011 @ 22:40
 
 
Someone said :
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-15017484## Speed-of-light experiments give baffling result at Cern Puzzling results from Cern, home of the LHC, have confounded physicists - because it appears subatomic particles have exceeded the speed of light.

Neutrinos sent through the ground from Cern toward the Gran Sasso laboratory 732km away seemed to show up a tiny fraction of a second early.

The result - which threatens to upend a century of physics - will be put online for scrutiny by other scientists.

In the meantime, the group says it is being very cautious about its claims.

"We tried to find all possible explanations for this," said report author Antonio Ereditato of the Opera collaboration.

"We wanted to find a mistake - trivial mistakes, more complicated mistakes, or nasty effects - and we didn't," he told BBC News.

"When you don't find anything, then you say 'Well, now I'm forced to go out and ask the community to scrutinise this.'"

Thats coming up on Newsnight on BBC 2.
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# 64 : Thursday 22-9-2011 @ 22:42
 
 
Welcome to the future....
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# 65 : Friday 23-9-2011 @ 09:53
 
 
I was reading up on the challenge to Einsteins theory of relativity thrown up by the recent CERN experiments, when my eye was drawn to this. I thought it might me a more popular kind of science story for the general Gaire audience!! Researchers identify wild orgy gene Ménage à trois? Wild orgies? One night stands? Who says science can't be sexy?

Certainly not Binghamton University researchers, who are hard at work uncovering the sultry secrets behind human sexual behavior.

The team - led by Dr. Justin Garcia - recently identified a dopamine receptor gene known as DRD4 that is purportedly linked to chronic infidelity and "uncommitted" one-night stands.

And wouldn't you know it?

The very same gene has already been linked to alcoholism, gambling addiction and a predilection for really bad horror movies.

Oddly enough, another study claimed the mysterious gene was responsible for political liberalism, along with "openness" to new social situations.

"What we found was that individuals with a certain variant of the DRD4 gene were more likely to have a history of uncommitted sex, including one-night stands and acts of infidelity," Garcia confirmed.

"The motivation seems to stem from a system of pleasure and reward, which is where the release of dopamine comes in. In cases of uncommitted sex, the risks are high, the rewards substantial and the motivation variable - all elements that ensure a dopamine 'rush.'"

Garcia also noted that individuals carrying the "thrill-seeking" gene were twice as likely to have a history of one-night stands as those without the variant.

"[Still], the study doesn't let transgressors off the hook. These relationships are associative, which means that not everyone with this genotype will have one-night stands or commit infidelity.

"Indeed, many people without this genotype still have one-night stands and commit infidelity. The study merely suggests that a much higher proportion of those with this genetic type are likely to engage in these behaviors," he added.
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# 66 : Friday 30-9-2011 @ 11:17
 
 
Someone said :
After mating, a female produces as many as 40 fertilized embryos, separated between two separate wombs. The embryos take nearly a year to fully develop, but they begin hunting long before that. After about two months, their own yolk sacs go dry. Hungry, they start eating their brothers and sisters. After the rampant in utero cannibalization, only one shark — the biggest and strongest — is left in each womb.

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# 67 : Sunday 2-10-2011 @ 11:11
 
 
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# 68 : Friday 5-9-2014 @ 00:39
 
 
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# 69 : Tuesday 3-4-2018 @ 20:07
 
 
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# 70 : Monday 16-4-2018 @ 21:44
 
 
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