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Fuel Allowance Being Cut For Pensioners This Week.
 
# 16 : Tuesday 13-9-2011 @ 20:03
 
 
But haven't OAPs got off very lightly with the cuts, compared to everyone else?

Twice in the past month, Ive taken a mid morning train from down home. Talk about the blue-rinse express. And all riding for free. Its a nonsense.
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# 17 : Tuesday 13-9-2011 @ 20:05
 
 
Someone said :

My heating bills isn't close to that for the whole year.

I'm not sure what type of dwelling you live in but my guess is that your heating bills are relatively low because your home is modern and well insulated. A lot of older people are living in homes that have little or no insulation.
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# 18 : Tuesday 13-9-2011 @ 20:08
 
 
Someone said :
My heating bills isn't close to that for the whole year.

A lot of OAP's might be indoors all day and not just switch the heating on at whatever time you might arrive home from work at

No I do understand that. I obviously don't expect any OAP to feel they need to save on heat either.

In some of the cases though the units they're allocated aren't being used.

I say run with it and review it.

My point in the beginning was just in relation to the smog allowance being cut and this is something that's on a lot of people in receipt of Social Welfare payments.

Last year they were receiving €930 odd for Fuel / Smog, this year it's reduced to €780.

€780 is more than enough to cover someone's heating over the year. The onus can't just be on the Govt for everything.
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# 19 : Tuesday 13-9-2011 @ 20:11
 
 
It just goes to show you you can slant anything to look like anything.
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# 20 : Tuesday 13-9-2011 @ 20:23
 
 
My electricity bill hit around €600 for two months during the cold snap. Granted I found two of the major culprits - a storage heater and a seriously draughty window both which I'll fix this month.

I heard somewhere (probably here) that some old people on the state pension live in just one room for the winter as they can't heat the house.

Although this really is down to a particular bugbear of mine - the cost of electricity in this country.
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# 21 : Tuesday 13-9-2011 @ 20:25
 
 
Solar panels could solve this problem.
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# 22 : Tuesday 13-9-2011 @ 20:25
 
 
Someone said :
My electricity bill hit around €600

Oh! Did you pay this one?
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# 23 : Tuesday 13-9-2011 @ 20:26
 
 
Death to the old! (and don't get angry at me, God invented it)
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# 24 : Tuesday 13-9-2011 @ 20:30
 
 
Someone said :

No I do understand that. I obviously don't expect any OAP to feel they need to save on heat either.

That is the reality Shaggy

MANY OLDER people are going to bed early in the evenings to save on rising fuel bills, according to research conducted by the Society of St Vincent de Paul.

She said some older people in winter months were going to bed as early as 7pm to save on heating, or are prepared to endure “siege of Leningrad” type conditions in winter to avoid large fuel bills.

Hot water bottles were used not only at night but during the day, while some people switched off their electricity once their free units were used up.

Others used a single room in the house that they kept warm and concentrated all their activities there by bringing the bed, cooker and electric kettle into the sitting room.

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/ireland/2011/0908/12243036999 etc ...

2.2.4. Fuel poverty

Almost half (47%) all households living in isolated rural areas in Northern Ireland experience fuel poverty. In Ireland, rural older people are twice as likely to lack central heating. The consultees reported that the greatest single demand on their income after food was fuel. Visitors to older people likewise reported that heating was the most prominent single stress point.   Many described fuel as ‘a big burden’, with the element of uncertainty of not knowing how much more would be needed from one year to the next, especially if there were a severe winter (as was the case in 2009 and 2010).  This was particularly true for older people who lived in large or open plan houses which were costly to heat.

Many individuals living in the larger houses (after their children had left) reported wanting to sell and downsize, but unable to find a buyer in the current economic climate. Many people in rural areas supplemented their heating and saved oil by using solid fuel, mainly logs. Many older men said that they had always enjoyed getting firewood organized and were sorry not to be able to do it anymore.  As people aged, they worried that they would not be able to deal with solid fuel.  Many older people remarked on how difficult it had been to stay warm during the winter and were very concerned about how they would cope if there were cuts to the pension and fuel allowances. Many contributors spoke of how old people managed frugally with fuel.  Although some were extravagant and ran heating excessively, that was unusual.    Consultees reported using a number of strategies to
keep their fuel costs down:

• They restricted central heating to a very small number of hours in the day.
• They wore heavy clothes indoors to keep warm.
• Fires were lit as late in the day as possible ‐ late afternoon ‐ and let die down as soon as 8pm.
• Hot water bottles were used not only at night but during the day. Some people went to bed for a couple of hours in the middle of the day to keep warm.
• Some people switched off their electricity once their free units were used up and, as one said, ‘then we freeze’.
• Some men, in saving electricity through not heating water, did not wash, resulting in deteriorating personal hygiene.
• Some colonized one room in the house which they kept warm and concentrated all their activities there, for example bringing the bed, cooker and electric kettle into the sitting room.
• Quite a number used a single point heat source in the home, like an electric bar fire or a paraffin heater, though this was not always very efficient.
• A Society Conference in Northern Ireland introduced a very successful fuel stamp system (in a scheme broadly similar to the TV licence stamps) to assist the people it supports to make regular savings towards a fill of oil.  Older people in the local area have availed of this scheme. While there is nothing necessarily wrong with conserving energy in a world of diminishing resources, the question arises as to whether heat levels in some homes were so low that older people ran the risk of hypothermia; second, whether it was appropriate that older people should be almost put to ‘siege of Leningrad‘ extremes to cope with the cold; and third, if older people are disproportionately affected.    Contributors pointed out that older people got colder more easily and felt the cold more, while others were not mobile and ended up huddled over an inadequate fire. The general persistence of fuel poverty reported by participants is remarkable, granted general improvements in housing, heating systems and insulation. Many older people now live in good housing conditions, either in new homes with higher standards or in old homes that had been renovated. A number of older people who attended the consultations had significant insulation work done with the support of a local authority grant and spoke about their homes being really comfortable and dry (‘not wringing damp’) for the first time in their lives.  But still, there was fuel poverty.

The type of heating system used by an older person had a central bearing on the extent of fuel poverty.   In rural districts of the West, many homes still relied on turf ranges and it remained the predominant heating system (followed by oil and then coal) but, by definition, not a very effective one (turf generates long‐lasting, but low heat levels).  In some urban areas, the Society met many old people who lived in homes with central heating run off the back boiler, which, while having its benefits, could supply heat to only some parts of the house for limited times during the day.  In both cases, the amount of heat available was limited.

Service users and members both noted that fuel payments finished too early and that cold often continued long beyond April. Contributors in the rural areas in the west pointed out that it was normal to run the house fire throughout the summer in order to cook and to get hot water, so that this seasonal distinction
was essentially an urban one: fuel allowances should run throughout the year.

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# 25 : Tuesday 13-9-2011 @ 20:30
 
 
Someone said :

Oh! Did you pay this one?

Glad to see you're paying attention. Yes I did.
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# 26 : Tuesday 13-9-2011 @ 20:33
 
 
Someone said :
Solar panels could solve this problem.

Great - heating for the summer months
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# 27 : Tuesday 13-9-2011 @ 20:34
 
 
Nuclear power would solve this problem. One way or another.
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# 28 : Tuesday 13-9-2011 @ 20:34
 
 
Someone said :
Nuclear power would solve this problem. One way or another.

Whats the other?
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# 29 : Tuesday 13-9-2011 @ 20:38
 
 
Someone said :

Whats the other?

Soylent Green

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# 30 : Tuesday 13-9-2011 @ 21:22
 
 

I'm sure the government and their little workers will try and dress it up somehow Mango and insist that they are not 'using their units'.
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