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Organ Donation
 
# 31 : Tuesday 1-12-2015 @ 20:12
 
 
At what point do they actually start removing the organs? Is it clinical death or some other - would hate the thoughts of it if I was still breathing
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# 32 : Tuesday 1-12-2015 @ 20:18
 
 
They wait; they may tap their toes a bit and look frequently at watches, but they do wait.
They do like you to be still warm.
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# 33 : Tuesday 1-12-2015 @ 20:19
 
 
Someone said :
At what point do they actually start removing the organs? Is it clinical death or some other - would hate the thoughts of it if I was still breathing

Organ donation is considered if a patient is on a ventilator and has been diagnosed brain stem dead.
The brain stem is the body's life support system. In brain stem death the brain stops functioning and will never function again. There is no chance of recovery.
http://www.beaumont.ie/kidneycentre-aboutus-nops-faq
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# 34 : Tuesday 1-12-2015 @ 20:23
 
 
Ahh they can declare you dead before that and start removing things. You won't be breathing on your own though.
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# 35 : Tuesday 1-12-2015 @ 20:25
 
 
I am set to be an organ donor. For a long time I was precious regarding certain organs, most especially my eyes. As many regulars here will be aware I am a friend of another (former?) poster who lost his sight and this made me think. When I am dead I am dead, if giving my eyes could help someone to see again would I really say no, could I really say no? I reflected on it I came to the conclusion that no, I'd a thousand times rather that my eyes went to giving someone the incomparable gift of sight than rotted in the ground. So now I am down for whatever they want to take. What anyone might want off me however is all together another story.
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# 36 : Tuesday 1-12-2015 @ 20:30
 
 
I may need a transplant one day myself but I was always a donor card holder, got one at 11. I think it was an episode of Casualty that made me want one.
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# 37 : Tuesday 1-12-2015 @ 20:44
 
 
Someone said :
What's wrong with your eyes?

A personal spiritual and religious observation - though I very much and strongly promote others in giving up their organs. I personally know two people who have directly benefited from organ donation - its an authentic gift of life
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# 38 : Tuesday 1-12-2015 @ 20:48
 
 
I think everyone should be automatically opted in though they should have the right to opt-out again.
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# 39 : Tuesday 1-12-2015 @ 20:55
 
 
I think it's fairly obvious there would be far more organs available for transplant if people were made to opt out rather than opt in.

Most people are naturally lazy and they will not bother being registered organ donors even though they may well be willing to donate them. I know, I'm one of those people.
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# 40 : Tuesday 1-12-2015 @ 21:17
 
 
Someone said :

A personal spiritual and religious observation - though I very much and strongly promote others in giving up their organs. I personally know two people who have directly benefited from organ donation - its an authentic gift of life

As someone who had those kind of thoughts regarding certain organs, including my eyes, I want to ask you (respectfully) what the spiritual, religious and moral implications are of privileging your 'feelings' over the concrete moral good of providing sight to a blind person? Is ones 'moral' comfort as a dead person really worth denying someone the chance to see?

Frankly, if it is then I suggest your moral paradigm is askew.
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# 41 : Tuesday 1-12-2015 @ 21:48
 
 
Opt in, opt out - it won't make any difference.
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# 42 : Tuesday 1-12-2015 @ 22:41
 
 
Someone said :
Opt in, opt out - it won't make any difference.

I disagree. An opt out system means everyone can be a donour by default, and therefore there will be far more potential donours.

I haven't done much research on this, but it seems the facts support my opinion.

Opt-in versus opt-out

There are two main methods for determining voluntary consent: "opt in" (only those who have given explicit consent are donors) and "opt out" (anyone who has not refused is a donor). Opt-out legislative systems dramatically increase effective rates of consent for donation (the so-called default effect).[4] For example, Germany, which uses an opt-in system, has an organ donation consent rate of 12% among its population, while Austria, a country with a very similar culture and economic development, but which uses an opt-out system, has a consent rate of 99.98%.[4][5]

However, because of public policies, cultural, infrastructural and other factors, this does not always translate directly into increased effective rates of donation. In terms of effective organ donations, in some systems like Australia (14.9 donors per million, 337 donors in 2011), family members are required to give consent or refusal, or may veto a potential recovery even if the donor has consented.[6] Some countries with an opt-out system like Spain (36 effective donors per million inhabitants[7]) or Austria (21 donors/million) have high donor rates and some countries with opt-in systems like Germany (16 donors/million) or Greece (6 donors/million) have lower effective donation rates.[

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organ_donation#Opt-in_versus_opt-ou etc ...
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# 43 : Wednesday 11-5-2016 @ 21:53
 
 
An opt out organ donation register will be in place by the end of 2017 (if this Govt is to be believed).

Great news anyway.
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# 44 : Thursday 12-5-2016 @ 08:21
 
 
Until you get the first lawsuit because organs were taken without a families consent. Opt out registers are great to a point, but they are useless if you don't have staff working in hospitals that can help the family through the process. And lots of hospitals don't and GPs/nurses are just too busy with their day jobs.
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# 45 : Thursday 12-5-2016 @ 15:51
 
 
i think the opt out system is great, you would have to give it taught if you did not want to be a donor, a lot dont think the other way, i always carry a card, if i cannot do fuck all when alive then maybe when i am dead
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