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Denmark: Equal Marriage Laws For Gay Couples Come Into Effect Today
 
# 1 : Friday 15-6-2012 @ 14:40
 
 
Denmark’s new laws allowing gay couples to marry in the state church have come into effect today.

The Folketing approved gender-neutral marriage last week by 85 votes to 24.

The Stefanskirken in Copenhagen draped a rainbow flag over its front and erected a banner reading: “Love knows no gender – congratulations Denmark”.

Danish gay news service Homotropolis said many churches in Copenhagen were planning to release rainbow-coloured balloons after services on Sunday morning in celebration of their new freedom to marry gay couples.

Charlotte Cappi Grunnet, minister in St. Thomas Church in Frederiksberg told Homotropolis: “It is extremely important and wonderful to be able to celebrate that we are finally able to allow same-sex couples to marry in the church.

“The fact that priests have been prevented from carrying out same-sex marriages has been a violation of the Christian belief, of love and of human equality. Until now I have been forced to treat others as if their love was inferior and second class.”

The state Lutheran Church, to which 80 percent of the Danish population belongs, will be able to perform marriage ceremonies under the new laws. New suggested rites were written up by ten of the Church’s eleven bishops in a spirit of “good cooperation”, Bishop Kjeld Holm said.

According to the Copenhagen Post, one of the new prayers for gay couples reads: “Dear God, Heavenly Father. Our lives are in your hand. You follow us through the days and nights. We thank you for the people we share our life with, for every loving glance, in whose light we have matured, and for each meeting: which has opened the world. We ask you, spread your loving sky above us and strengthen us by your grace, so we never hesitate to put our lives in each others’ hands. Amen.”

The bishop of Helsingør, Lise Lotte Rebel, was reported to have said the rites “seem to accentuate the romantic notion of love between people”, turning the focus from God and creating “a major theological problem”.

Gay couples will be able to marry in state churches of their choice but priests will not be obliged to perform weddings. They would, however, need to help the couple find a priest who would marry them at the church under the new laws.

Other faith groups are not compelled to allow gay wedding ceremonies in their places of worship.
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# 2 : Friday 15-6-2012 @ 15:38
 
 
Interesting. Denmark was the first country to introduce civil partnership. When I was in Copenhagen for the Out Games in 2009 the general feeling among local gays seemed to be that, in not providing for gay marriage, the country had fallen way behind. Well now they are out in front again - Church solemnised gay marriages! As the Americans might say "way to go!"
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# 3 : Friday 15-6-2012 @ 15:44
 
 
I don't get it.
I don't understand what a state church is.
Why would a state/nation have a church?
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# 4 : Friday 15-6-2012 @ 16:06
 
 
In Denmark, Norway and Sweden the Lutheran Church is the State Church - somewhat like the Church of England is the "established" church in England and Wales.
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# 5 : Friday 15-6-2012 @ 16:12
 
 
Someone said :
In Denmark, Norway and Sweden the Lutheran Church is the State Church - somewhat like the Church of England is the "established" church in England and Wales.

...and somewhat like the Catlick Church is the "established" church in Eire?
Well, surely what any civilized country should do first is get rid of notions such as "State Church".
Any civilized country should fully separate state/government from church/religion.

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# 6 : Friday 15-6-2012 @ 17:23
 
 
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/denmark/9317447/ etc ...
The country's parliament voted through the new law on same-sex marriage by a large majority, making it mandatory for all churches to conduct gay marriages.

I still don't really understand this.

Some questions:
Aren't churches private organizations like any "club"?

Does this mean that the rules of the religions that own the churches have been forcibly changed by state law? (That would be a bit daft).

Is this any different than pushing for same-sex marriage to be allowed to take place in mosques or in synagogues or in football stadiums or in biscuit factories?

If church and state were completely separate, would Denmark have to introduce this stupid law?

Wouldn't that leave the church free to create its own rules so that anyone who likes those rules can be a member of the church?

Does this mean anything for Ireland unless we are to push for same-sex marriages to be allowed to take place in catlick churches? and Who wants that?
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# 7 : Friday 15-6-2012 @ 17:38
 
 
Sheesh Clock, go research it then.

thats a few too many question to be dealt with in one topic.

I say good on them, from the sound of it there are at least a few priests and ministers who are welcoming the change.
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# 8 : Friday 15-6-2012 @ 17:43
 
 
I couldn't be bothered with most of your questions, Clock, but the State Church in Denmark is publicly funded and headed up by the monarch. So unlike the Catholic Church, it is a public body and I guess subject to state legislation on its operations.
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# 9 : Friday 15-6-2012 @ 17:53
 
 
Someone said :
the State Church in Denmark is publicly funded and headed up by the monarch. So unlike the Catholic Church, it is a public body and I guess subject to state legislation on its operations.

Well, that makes it completely different.
Anything that is publicly funded shouldn't be allowed to discriminate against members of the public (taxpayers).
Of course the real issue is that religions shouldn't be publicly funded, but that's up to the Danes.
I hope the catholic church in Ireland receives no taxpayers' money.
This news is fairly irrelevant (to me) really.
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# 10 : Friday 15-6-2012 @ 17:57
 
 
I don't think Ireland needs a solution similar to Denmark (much as I commend it).

I reckon just the state recognising the marriage is fine, it;s not like somebody will complain "but I wanted to get married in a church "

having a civil ceremony is fine, Atheist couples do it all the time. only what they get is a state recognized marriage unlike gay people who as of yet get a diet coke, token certificate, next-best-thing "Civil Union".
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# 11 : Friday 15-6-2012 @ 18:43
 
 
Someone said :
I don't think Ireland needs a solution similar to Denmark (much as I commend it).

I reckon just the state recognising the marriage is fine, it;s not like somebody will complain "but I wanted to get married in a church "

having a civil ceremony is fine, Atheist couples do it all the time. only what they get is a state recognized marriage unlike gay people who as of yet get a diet coke, token certificate, next-best-thing "Civil Union".

I agree. Though I would love to get married in a church. I will one day, to a man.
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# 12 : Friday 15-6-2012 @ 18:47
 
 
Someone said :

I agree. Though I would love to get married in a church. I will one day, to a man.

God or Jesus?
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# 13 : Friday 15-6-2012 @ 19:11
 
 
Got to love the Danes!
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# 14 : Friday 15-6-2012 @ 19:19
 
 
Someone said :

...and somewhat like the Catlick Church is the "established" church in Eire?
Well, surely what any civilized country should do first is get rid of notions such as "State Church".
Any civilized country should fully separate state/government from church/religion.

No, not anymore. The Roman Catholic Church did have special status in the Constituion, but that was removed decades ago. The established nature of the churces in the named nordic country and in the UK is different. For example, in the UK, the Prime Minister decides who the Archbishop of Canterbury is (although technically it is the Queen who appoints him).

Actually, such was the control of the Roman Catholic Church over state affairs in ireland, you could say things were the other way around and that Ireland was an established state of the Roman Catholic Church.
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# 15 : Friday 15-6-2012 @ 19:24
 
 
Someone said :

I agree. Though I would love to get married in a church. I will one day, to a man.

Why?
Because of the architecture and interior design?
or
Because of the Catholicism/Protestantism?

Do you want Catholicism/Protestantism to change its rules to allow same-sex marriage?
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