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Recognition Of Irish Sign Language Bill Defeated In The Seanad
 
 Poll Choices 9 Total Votes
55.56% / 5 Votes
33.33% / 3 Votes
11.11% / 1 Vote
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# 16 : Monday 18-12-2017 @ 07:10
 
 
Oliver Johnson, not trying to be glib about it, wouldn't a universal spoken language be better for hearing people?

So tiring having all these spoken languages, Spanish, English, Mandarin Chinese... I know, let's all settle on the most commonly spoken language on the planet, and forget the rest. Let's all speak Chinese.

If you think this is ridiculous, it is because it is. It is no less ridiculous to ask the same of us who sign. It is because you do not view sign languages to be on par with spoken languages. If you did, you wouldn't dream of asking such a thing.

We signing people (both who hear and do not hear, we are not all Deaf) are sick and tired of non-signers constantly making the assumption that

1. Sign language is universal
2. What, it isn't? Then it should be?!

With respect, who do you think you are?

Yes, there is a universal sign system , but it is not a language . Only people who travel a lot would understand it. It would be inaccurate to try to recognise it as a language when it lacks the features that make it a language.

We have our sign language here in this country. There are people who converse in this language who were marginalised by not having their language recognised in this country. Now the situation has changed, on paper at least.

Ozren explained quite nicely why this is the case.


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# 17 : Monday 18-12-2017 @ 10:02
 
 
Well
Our largest EU migrants are from the UK 2nd largest Poland.
Our largest non EU is China.

So if we want to talk about recognising minority languages mandarin and polish probably come first.
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# 18 : Monday 18-12-2017 @ 10:34
 
 
Someone said :
Well
Our largest EU migrants are from the UK 2nd largest Poland.
Our largest non EU is China.

So if we want to talk about recognising minority languages mandarin and polish probably come first.

way to ignore everything!
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# 19 : Monday 18-12-2017 @ 10:48
 
 
Someone said :
Well
Our largest EU migrants are from the UK 2nd largest Poland.
Our largest non EU is China.

So if we want to talk about recognising minority languages mandarin and polish probably come first.

We are talking about marginalised Irish citizens here if you want to pull the nationality card.
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# 20 : Monday 18-12-2017 @ 10:54
 
 
Someone said :
You make some very eloquent points there Blah & i'm not trying to be glib about this .. wouldn't a universal sign language be better so as deaf people all over the world had a common tongue in which to converse, spanglish for the hard of hearing so too speak..?

What Intrepid said, plus:

You have a very restricted view of "universal" if you use Spanglish, or even Esperanto, as a yard stick.

How are these Universal, so to speak, to languages not using the roman alphabet or a letter-based transcription, or using clicking and other phonetical peculiarities, etc ?
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# 21 : Monday 18-12-2017 @ 12:17
 
 
Someone said :
We are talking about marginalised Irish citizens here if you want to pull the nationality card.

Hello... what makes you think they are not Irish citizens?
I think Irish sign language should be recognised , I mean how much could it cost ?
The gov funds things that wouldn't benefit as many people.
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# 22 : Monday 18-12-2017 @ 13:33
 
 
Someone said :
Hello... what makes you think they are not Irish citizens?[...]

Well played... but you know full well that only a minority of the Polish or Chinese speakers are also Irish citizens.

"Minority languages" are not just any odd language spoken natively (or not) by a few citizens. You obviously know that Chinese or Polish are not "minority languages" in Ireland: they are the languages of a minority of a minority of some Irish people. Not the same thing.

But savor the formal win/satisfaction that nit-picking just on the line just beside the point procures.
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# 23 : Monday 18-12-2017 @ 14:22
 
 
...
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# 24 : Monday 18-12-2017 @ 14:27
 
 
Someone said :
Hello... what makes you think they are not Irish citizens?

Indeed. I am not talking about them.
I think Irish sign language should be recognised , I mean how much could it cost ?
The gov funds things that wouldn't benefit as many people.

A lot of costs would go towards interpreters. In the long term it is cheaper than cochlear implants.

Cheers.
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# 25 : Monday 18-12-2017 @ 17:41
 
 
OK, i feel a bit more informed now.. Might take this course in the new year.

https://www.nightcourses.com/course/sign-language-124068/

I would be interested in maybe doing some work as an interpreter somewhere down the line.. I know this one is pretty basic but you gotta start somewhere.. better or more appropriate suggestions welcome..
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# 26 : Monday 18-12-2017 @ 18:45
 
 
Someone said :
But savor the formal win/satisfaction that nit-picking just on the line just beside the point procures.

Wha?
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# 27 : Monday 18-12-2017 @ 20:48
 
 
it would be a good start, Oliver Johnston.

The Centre for Deaf Studies offers interpreting courses and takes on people with no sign language, teaching you how to sign, then to interpret. It's a 4 year degree course. (They offer other courses too)

https://www.tcd.ie/slscs/cds/

As you said, an evening class would be a good place to start off with.
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# 28 : Sunday 24-12-2017 @ 12:25
 
 
Irish Sign Language given official legal recognition New Act will allow use of the language in courts and for State services for 50,000 people

President Michael D Higgins has signed new legislation conferring legal recognition on Irish Sign Language.

The Irish Sign Language Bill 2016 was passed by the Oireachtas earlier this month, and is now officially designated as a native and independent language following the President’s approval.

The new Act will benefit some 50,000 members of the deaf community in the State who will be able to access services through the language, which can also now be used in the courts when necessary.

The Private Members Bill was first introduced by Fianna Fáil Senator Mark Daly, and went on to receive cross-party support in the Oireachtas.

Mr Daly said he hopes the legal recognition will help to end the “extreme marginalisation” felt by the deaf community in Irish society.

A quality assurance and registration scheme will be established for interpreters, who will also be able to avail of ongoing professional training.

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/social-affairs/irish-sign-languag etc ...
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