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How Far Back Can You Trace Your Family.
 
# 31 : Tuesday 14-10-2014 @ 01:20
 
 
From my mothers family, the latest we can go back is that their family name is Lavelle, my grandmothers maiden name and is believed to be from sailors and/or mercenaries who stayed after the landing of the French in North Mayo. My mothers family are obsessed by everything French so it's in there.

Also the same family fought a lot in both world wars for their country (the UK at the time) and that's a proud element to my mothers side. Irish nationalism in forgetting about them is irrelevant in the family historical construct.
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# 32 : Tuesday 14-10-2014 @ 02:21
 
 
Someone said :

How long ago was that?

About 1750.
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# 33 : Saturday 1-11-2014 @ 17:24
 
 
My dad showed me a photo of his father that someone had given him recently, the photo was 95 years old and showed my grandfather with his football team.
He was born in 1901 which i still find hard to get my head around.
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# 34 : Saturday 1-11-2014 @ 19:10
 
 
If you find a full stop in your search - do a name search at http://www.oldbaileyonline.org/ just put your surname in the keyword box and prepare to be astounded. They might not be related but the crimes and punishment plus the court preceding's are hair raising - glad I wasn't around then
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# 35 : Saturday 1-11-2014 @ 19:35
 
 
As in with most Irish families 1850's, my family where fisherpeople and west brit bussiness persons, I think I may have post that already in this thread, ah for feck sake.
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# 36 : Saturday 1-11-2014 @ 21:02
 
 
Welcome back Pixie!
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# 37 : Thursday 6-11-2014 @ 19:06
 
 
Off to see One Million Dubliners this evening, the documentary about Glasnevin cemetery.

Great place to start climbing your family tree
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# 38 : Saturday 8-11-2014 @ 17:35
 
 
How was it?
I must take a visit out there soon. The last time i went they were doing up the visitor centre and making details available on computers.
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# 39 : Saturday 8-11-2014 @ 17:43
 
 
Loved it, very moving
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# 40 : Monday 24-11-2014 @ 14:58
 
 
Someone said :
Someone asked me to put together a list of sites I'd used to compile family histories. I had a good head scratch and came up with these.

1. CENSUS RETURNS
What it says on the tin - it contains details of the census forms for 1901 and 1911 and also bits and pieces from 1821-51.

http://www.census.nationalarchives.ie/

2. CENSUS SEARCH FORMS
These are from the first couples of decades of the last century when the old age pension was introduced. People aged 70 or over in 1908 were eligible but needed access to census data from 1841 or 1851 to prove their age. So they submitted requests to the authorities who would then check the census records. So, there are in some cases details of census records that were subsequently destroyed in the early 1920s.

More info here:
http://censussearchforms.nationalarchives.ie/search/cs/home.jsp

You can run searches here.
http://censussearchforms.nationalarchives.ie/search/cs/

3. GRIFFITHS VALUATIONS
Griffiths Valuations - carried out between 1848 and 1864 to assess liability to pay the Poor Law Union rate. They're on this website: www.askaboutireland.com

You can search the records here:
http://www.askaboutireland.ie/griffith-valuation/index.xml

Only the head of household is mentioned.

4. TITHE APPLOTMENT BOO KS
The website is http://titheapplotmentbooks.nationalarchives.ie/search/tab/home.j etc ...

The information is from the 1820s and 1830s. It was compiled to determine the amount which occupiers (of all faiths) of holdings over one acre should pay in tithes to the Church of Ireland.

5. FLAX GROWERS OF 1796
Might be useful - it contains some 60,000 records.
http://www.failteromhat.com/flax1796.php

6. ROOTS IRELAND
The website is www.rootsireland.ie. It has a lot of church records, baptisms marriages etc. You have to pay to do meaningful searches.

6. ELLIS ISLAND WEBSITE.
This one is handy for looking up relatives who emigrated to the USA - www.ellisisland.org

7. GENERAL WEBSITES
The last two are free. The first three sometimes do special offers.
www.findmypast.ie
www.ancestry.com
http://www.militaryarchives.ie/
https://familysearch.org/
http://www.irishnewsarchive.com/

8. OLD IRISH NEWSPAPERS
I got some bits and bobs in here. It's hit and miss though.
http://www.irelandoldnews.com/

9. ORDNANCE SURVEY MAPS
Not much use for names but comparing the 1830s map and the 1890 (approx.) map with the ones in the Griffiths Evaluations can be handy in terms of figuring out who lived where.
http://maps.osi.ie/

10. GLASNEVIN CEMETERY RECORDS
Another link - this one might be especially useful for all you True Blue Jubliners whose great-great-great-grandparents, as chislers, chased Molly Malone around the Coombe in the hope that a cockle or mussel might fall from her wheelbarrow:
http://www.glasnevintrust.ie/genealogy/

Unless your family was la crème de la crème (or at least la crème ), then researching the history of families in 19th century Dublin is a bloody nightmare. Most people moved around a lot - renting some room until the arrears they'd built up meant that they were about to be evicted. So they'd move on.
ReplyWebsite
 
# 41 : Sunday 4-1-2015 @ 00:50
 
 
11. IRISH GENEALOGY (CHURCH RECORDS)
This could be a huge help to anyone with ancestors in Dublin. I'd found this website last summer but back then, they only had records for some dioceses in the south of the country so I'd discounted it. I checked back a few weeks ago and they'd added loads of stuff for Dublin - all denominations. Now they've also added Carlow Church of Ireland records.
http://churchrecords.irishgenealogy.ie/churchrecords/

Anyway, I found huge amounts of info on marriages and baptisms on one Dublin branch of the family tree.
ReplyWebsite
 
# 42 : Tuesday 10-9-2019 @ 21:37
 
 
My Family moved to the Kilkenny area about 700 years ago approx, from an area in England. The Family surname is almost the same as the Area in England, which still exists.. So, I'm probably a mix of Roman/Anglo-Saxon/Viking & Celt..
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# 43 : Wednesday 11-9-2019 @ 05:01
 
 
My family are from Northern Ireland, my sisters and I were born in Belfast and we moved down to Dublin when I was 18 months old. Belfast in 1976 was not a good place to be, as you can imagine...

Anyhow, I did a family tree project in 2nd year in secondary school and my mum and maternal grandmother gave a lot of help on that. I was able to trace my father’s family back to the early 19th century, farmers and town tradesmen in east County Derry, around Coleraine. My surname, Shiels, has Scottish origins and my paternal great grandfather’s family on my grandmother’s side, Gillespie, came directly from Scotland in the 17th or early 18th century.

My mother’s family, the McGeowns, were from Tyrone and were farmers. My mum herself grew up on a farm but the family moved to Belfast when my mum was 17 in 1959/60. My great great grandfather was a miller in Tyrone and his water mill was reconstructed at the Ulster Folk Museum at Cultra outside Belfast. My maternal grandmother, Elizabeth Gallagher, and her ancestors were from Ballaghaderreen in Roscommon.

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# 44 : Wednesday 11-9-2019 @ 21:50
 
 
I was at a recent genealogical lecture given by a Scottish lecturer.
She had a Gaelic name - Mc Something.
In a question to her, I explained about the Great Famine of 1845 - 1850 and how
all records were lost in that time and can we possibly recover them etc.
Wait for it ....
SHE NEVER EVEN HEARD OF THE IRISH FAMINE
I kid you not.
And she wasn't even embarrassed.
Everywhere I lived on Earth, everyone knows about it - it's taught in their schools.

No problem to someone with a British 'education' and, more worryingly still,
no problem to her Oirish forelock-tugging, knee-bending, arse-licking, post-colonial cretins that were her audience.
Jesus F::king Christ what is wrong with the Oirish?
The Irish are the most wonderful people on Earth, as all other nations can testify, and only the post-colonial Oirish don't know it.
.........

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# 45 : Wednesday 11-9-2019 @ 22:14
 
 
Someone said :
My family are from Northern Ireland, my sisters and I were born in Belfast and we moved down to Dublin when I was 18 months old. Belfast in 1976 was not a good place to be, as you can imagine...

Anyhow, I did a family tree project in 2nd year in secondary school and my mum and maternal grandmother gave a lot of help on that. I was able to trace my father’s family back to the early 19th century, farmers and town tradesmen in east County Derry, around Coleraine. My surname, Shiels, has Scottish origins and my paternal great grandfather’s family on my grandmother’s side, Gillespie, came directly from Scotland in the 17th or early 18th century.

My mother’s family, the McGeowns, were from Tyrone and were farmers. My mum herself grew up on a farm but the family moved to Belfast when my mum was 17 in 1959/60. My great great grandfather was a miller in Tyrone and his water mill was reconstructed at the Ulster Folk Museum at Cultra outside Belfast. My maternal grandmother, Elizabeth Gallagher, and here ancestors were from Ballaghaderreen in Roscommon.

I like what you said but ... the 'Scottish' are made up of three very different groups.
The original Picts
The later invasion of the monks and educators from the north of Ireland. These Gaelic people were called Scotti - hence the modern name of Scotiland or Scotland.
Then came the Anglo-Saxons who couldn't read or write so, naturally, the Scots were hated by them.
My family clan came from Scotland to Ulster in the 15th Century- after having gone there many hundreds of years before.
Your family name Gillespie means Mac Giolla Espeagh which means 'the son of the servant (or follower) of the Bishop'
It is from Ulster and the Western Isles of Scotland.
Lime my own name it probably went there and returned many generations later,
..........

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