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How Would You Fix Health Service?
 
# 1 : Wednesday 2-12-2015 @ 00:49
 
 
The problem of hospital overcrowding and health insurance premiums has bedevilled every government. How you you fix it? Can it be fixed?

Some ideas of mine:

- If the health budget can't afford certain treatments, then outsource those treatments to private hospitals instead. James Reilly's policy was to abolish the National Treatment Purchase Fund. This will only load patients onto already overcrowded public hospital wards who would otherwise have been treated in private hospitals.

- Fast-track planning permission for new hospitals. The delays on the National Childrens Hospital were ridiculous. Also apparently Beaumont Hospital needed 20 years to get permission.

- Medical malpractice lawsuit reform would health reduce premiums.

- Outsource roles like electricians. I remember a stupid strike some years ago when staff who were not electricians changed lightbulbs and the electricians went on strike.

- Perfomance related pay.

Thoughts?
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# 2 : Wednesday 2-12-2015 @ 00:58
 
 
Someone in the UK had a solution a couple of years ago,one of the ideas was to have the consultants and other top management work an extra half day instead of going golfing or doing nixers on the side,they need to get off their pampered holes and start earning their inflated salaries,the nurses and doctors who do the most important work are way too undervalued,it's time this bloody nonsense was stopped once and for all.
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# 3 : Wednesday 2-12-2015 @ 01:19
 
 
fixed all salaries to be percentage of other salaries, including bonuses.
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# 4 : Wednesday 2-12-2015 @ 02:08
 
 
Get rid of the Health Service Executive for starters. It's a bloated, wasteful bureaucracy that does nothing to solve frontline issues in healthcare.
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# 5 : Wednesday 2-12-2015 @ 02:29
 
 
Someone said :
Get rid of the Health Service Executive for starters. It's a bloated, wasteful bureaucracy that does nothing to solve frontline issues in healthcare.

What would you replace it with? Would you bring back the health boards, or give the HSE's powers to the Dept of Health?

I do agree that the HSE is bloated. I've read a discussion on reddit about an administrator whose job was simply to go around checking that forms were filled in correctly. The poster made the point that such people simply got in the way.
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# 6 : Sunday 13-12-2015 @ 22:01
 
 
We don't need the HSE ,
We need more consultants , more specialists and more accountability .
if the HSE don't fulfill their targets they should be fired , simple as.


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# 7 : Monday 14-12-2015 @ 09:00
 
 
Stop consultants, double jobbing and get rid of un-necessary secretary's/managers. Also introduce Euthanasia, for those who would want to use it and not want to be kept alive in agony.
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# 8 : Monday 14-12-2015 @ 10:12
 
 
I have a friend who is a senior mananger in the HSE, she started out as a typist 40 years ago and worked her way up the system. Of course she is looked down upon as a lesser being by the new swanky managers with their masters degrees etc. She has six staff in her IT department, all earning €75,000 + per year. This is in a regional management centre, last January the IT section was centralised to Dublin, they 6 people still get their salaries etc, Unions, Contracts protect them. It is impossible to get rid of them. They turn up and do absolutely nothing all day. Of course the morale in the centre has been seriously damaged by the fact that these guys do nothing.
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# 9 : Monday 14-12-2015 @ 10:13
 
 
So where do you start, reform of the state service.
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# 10 : Monday 14-12-2015 @ 11:41
 
 
I would start by providing cheaper and more easily accessible primary care for all. Secondly, we need to invest more in care for the elderly and infirm. If we opened a couple of thousand convalescent beds tomorrow, the madness at A&E wouldn't be vastly reduced.
Reply
 
# 11 : Monday 14-12-2015 @ 11:44
 
 
Someone said :
I would start by providing cheaper and more easily accessible primary care for all. Secondly, we need to invest more in care for the elderly and infirm. If we opened a couple of thousand convalescent beds tomorrow, the madness at A&E wouldn't be vastly reduced.

And would you accept higher taxes to pay for that, or at least a freeze on tax cuts?

I think alcoholics could help by not getting themselves into a state where they have to be hospitalised. We need to phase out alcohol sponsorship of sport and advertising.
Reply
 
# 12 : Monday 14-12-2015 @ 11:52
 
 
Someone said :
And would you accept higher taxes to pay for that, or at least a freeze on tax cuts?

I think alcoholics could help by not getting themselves into a state where they have to be hospitalised. We need to phase out alcohol sponsorship of sport and advertising.

It isn't necessarily about raising taxes, it's about value for money.
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# 13 : Monday 14-12-2015 @ 12:09
 
 
Someone said :
And would you accept higher taxes to pay for that, or at least a freeze on tax cuts?

I think alcoholics could help by not getting themselves into a state where they have to be hospitalised. We need to phase out alcohol sponsorship of sport and advertising.

I wouldn't mind a levy of some sort.
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# 14 : Monday 14-12-2015 @ 12:10
 
 
Part of the problem is that successive govts lack the political will to support reforming ministers when the going gets tough. James Reilly with universal health insurance is one example. Mary Harney with hospital colocation is another. There was an old retired nurse on Liveline recently who said in the 1960s there was always a bed.
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# 15 : Monday 14-12-2015 @ 12:23
 
 
Someone said :
Part of the problem is that successive govts lack the political will to support reforming ministers when the going gets tough. James Reilly with universal health insurance is one example. Mary Harney with hospital colocation is another. There was an old retired nurse on Liveline recently who said in the 1960s there was always a bed.

Vested interests are a huge part of the problem.
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