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The Demise Of The Rural Irish Town
 
# 16 : Friday 28-12-2018 @ 15:29
 
 
It's because small businesses cannot get the same stock prices of larger stores, nor save on bulk logistics.

If you think they should "shut door and move on" then you're literally saying you want no rural businesses, and that is what's happening.

Moving physical items cost money. online, you've not payed for delivery yet, in stores, it's already moved to "right in front of you" it will cost you more then the price you see online excluding delivery.

You cant have it both ways; You can't work in a high street business and get paid well in a secure job, and then spend your money online or in mega stores in city centers.
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# 17 : Friday 28-12-2018 @ 17:04
 
 
SO are you saying, taxes and building rents are driving up business costs?
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# 18 : Friday 28-12-2018 @ 23:10
 
 
City centres are also losing out to shopping centres : why ? Free parking, choice .
Rural towns have to up their game if they want to compete .
Lidl Aldi and supervalu all put their stores in rural town centres where possible not outside them so they are after that market and they bring business into the towns.
The towns themselves need to work out how to attract new businesses and how to attract customers .
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# 19 : Saturday 29-12-2018 @ 04:09
 
 
But what about when there's no "game" left to "up"?

Say I run a book store, no staff, I work there alone, myself, and I don't pay myself a wage, I simply "live off the profit my shop makes" also, I'm not renting the premises, I own it, no commercial rent to pay.

Lo, and behold, my payday finally arrives; JK has written the new 'Harry Potter and the Saucer of Bullshit'

I order 50 copies @ 16 euro per unit, and the crate costs 100 to ship to my door (essentially meaning the stock costs me 18 per unit),
I decide to sell them for 25.99 euro to give myself 2 euros profit per sale, after tax.

Then I look at Eason's up town, and they're selling it for 22.99, because they ordered 25,000 units for their warehouse @ 12.50 per unit, and only 45cent per unit shipping because they do it internally and keep the surplus at their warehouse.

Then it turns out Tesco knew the book would sell well, blanket ordered 100,000 copies to be distributed nationwide @10 euros a unit, almost zero shipping cost per unit, and selling them for 15.99

Now, they're SELLING the book, at a price cheaper then I can possibly acquire them as stock
What if I had staff wages to pay? or had to rent the premises?

SO what game have I left to 'up'?

Then, after Harry potter sells, and my "sure to sell release" has been completely usurped by Tesco, Tesco goes back to selling cabbages and loaves of bread, and my shop, with 1000's of different books, goes out of business.

And then, there is no where you can buy specialist books. Only places you can buy the "big selling books" and the world is made stupider, and towns lose their businesses, and everyone disappears up their own arses.

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# 20 : Saturday 29-12-2018 @ 08:12
 
 
Someone said :
It's because small businesses cannot get the same stock prices of larger stores, nor save..... *Snip... Stating the obvious again.

As I said... Go do something else to earn a living.
I was in electrical retail during the 90s while also holding down several residencies as a DJ. Then the likes of Dixon's and power city forced the small retailer I was working for to close.
I immediately got a job as a store detective and did as much overtime as I could. Made a fortune and kept paying the bills.

What are you supposed to do? Sit in your empty shop crying and pointing fingers?
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# 21 : Thursday 3-1-2019 @ 03:30
 
 
Someone said :

As I said... Go do something else to earn a living.
I was in electrical retail during the...

snip, yes, I understood you changed your trade, congratulations on adapting adequately and not starving to death in an empty shop.
Someone said :

What are you supposed to do? Sit in your empty shop crying and pointing fingers?

No, indeed you're not supposed to do that. Sitting in your empty shop crying and pointing fingers doesn't achieve anything, but doing that, nor does it incentivise change in how a country is run or organized in ways that might preserve and develop rural towns.

You're disengaging before you're listening to the point I'm making, and it's kind of annoying.
First of all, the thread is about the demise of rural towns, not "losing your job because of a failing industry, thus changing your career".

Yes a quick change of skills can save you in a pinch, and these things do happen when industries fail or become redundant. i.e., record stores, video rentals libraries and, formal hat boutiques so your wife/mother can legally attend mass.

But this is not what this topic is about, this topic is about the demise of rural towns.
This is not about the "failing" of an industry or market, which does also happen. It's about the "centralization" of industry and market, specifically to Dublin, which is absolutely rampant and a seperate issue to big stores making you drive out the road a bit for your new toaster.
Our country is set up in a way that you'd be an idiot not to only bother with doing business in Dublin in 9/10 businesses.

your answer is "well then, no point crying about it"
mine is "I'm not crying, I'm saying it needs to be run better, so that losing rural towns is not a consequence of the 'most effective business practice' in a country as small as Ireland"

If the utter economical destruction of rural towns is a natural result of the systems in place of how of how we run our country, then we need to change or improve that system.

I mean, what will it take for you to see there's room for improvement?
When the whole of Leinster is communting to the city center; the only place there are jobs, and then commuting for hours again in the evening, back to the only place they can afford rent? in a small town, with 4 boarded up streets, 3 pubs, 3 cafe's and a centra? that has been this size or bigger, since 1980?

Accepting it any moving on is what you're supposed to do anyways when it comes to redundency.
I've been made redundant in full-time work too, I moved on.
That's just called 'keeping bread on the table' but abandoned small towns, entire streets of businesses boarded up, and the ludicrous rent prices, homelessness, crazy prices in Dublin are not two situations you should have in a competently run country.
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# 22 : Thursday 3-1-2019 @ 08:49
 
 
To jump start town centres they need to offer more than the shopping centres, things the local and Central government can do is, reduce commercial rates, put a cap on what localities are allowed to charge for rates, give funding for roll out of ultra high speed broadband all towns with a population over 1,500, abolish parking charges, create a focal point in most towns where people can meet and kids play.
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# 23 : Thursday 3-1-2019 @ 10:02
 
 
Excellent reply!
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# 24 : Thursday 3-1-2019 @ 11:29
 
 
Its happening the world over, not just in rural Ireland. As the big companies with all the jobs select the main cities as their central hubs for communication and infrastructure proximity, so follow the younger generations in search of employment.
Until the jobs decide to allow people 'work from home remotely' or move away from the cities.. this ageing rural phenomenon is going to continue. People don't want to have to drive hours to get to and from work. People in the cities don't want to drive at all and so will pay the excessive rent for a room somewhere that they can commute by the luasssss...or walk. So the rural places begin to 'die off' along with the elders left behind. Its sad but what can we do about it?
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# 25 : Thursday 3-1-2019 @ 20:03
 
 
Someone said :
To jump start town centres they need to offer more than the shopping centres, things the local and Central government can do is, reduce commercial rates, put a cap on what localities are allowed to charge for rates, give funding for roll out of ultra high speed broadband all towns with a population over 1,500, abolish parking charges, create a focal point in most towns where people can meet and kids play.

It still won't make people pay €1200 for their new TV in McDarvins TV and 3 in 1 superstore, when they can buy it for €300 in Aussie McHaventaclue's.

Your idea will make a nice little village, but how will it take business back from the likes of Dundrum or Blanch?
Marks and Spencer aren't suddenly going to up roots and move to Smithboro because it has a nice place for kids to play and a bit of fat pipe.
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# 26 : Thursday 3-1-2019 @ 22:13
 
 
Online shopping is the future, Retail is dying and only a few will remain soon.
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# 27 : Friday 4-1-2019 @ 13:54
 
 
That would be a nightmare..
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# 28 : Friday 4-1-2019 @ 23:15
 
 
I buy in shops in town, fuck amazon and the shit they sailed in on.
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# 29 : Saturday 5-1-2019 @ 00:32
 
 
Reducing or placing a cap on rates could encourage people to set up a shop or office in a town or village, high speed broadband could make moving to a small town for a small business more viable and nicer than using a shared office space in Dublin, free parking and somewhere to meet in town could attract more people in to the town, it won't get large supermarkets but might encourage small shops, like butchers, fishmongers, florists, coffee shops, super values, lidls etc. Attract new business and life to dead or dying towns.
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# 30 : Saturday 5-1-2019 @ 09:15
 
 
Someone said :
, like butchers, fishmongers, florists, coffee shops, super values, lidls etc. Attract new business and life to dead or dying towns.

It still comes down to buying power though?
Are you going to buy a piece of fish for twice the price in a local shop? Even though the quality is the same as a fish counter in a large store.
Don't forget... If you cover a small village in large supermarkets and discount stores, the locals will moan about it and block planning permission.

Rural people can be their own worst enemy. You simply can't win.
I live in a town with shit mobile coverage because the locals have blocked progress and will continue to do so. They went up in arms because a perfectly clean pound shop opened. Got it closed down.
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