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Teacher's Pet Or Pest?
 
# 1 : Saturday 30-5-2020 @ 11:52
 
 
I have been known to miss my bus on purpose in the rain just to get a lift home from my French/Art or English teachers.
I have also been known playing to my music class the parodic double-entendre song bearing the name of my music teacher. Or answering to my French teacher that the main character was not bitten by an insect, because scorpions are not insects, and they sting. Or correcting the pronunciation of my English teacher in a phonetics lesson.

Do you remember fondly stories of how you related very well with some teachers, versus time when you clashed with them?

(My mother was once summoned by a teacher, because my sister said humans were mammals. Obviously she took my sister's side.)
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# 2 : Saturday 30-5-2020 @ 17:06
 
 
Or answering to my French teacher that the main character was not bitten by an insect, because scorpions are not insects, and they sting. Or correcting the pronunciation of my English teacher in a phonetics lesson.

If I were your teacher I would have stopped the lesson especially to lecture you about disrespecting someone trying to teach a class. If it was french, you were learning french not biological trivia.


In school I was quiet.
I did nothing to anyone and teachers always just said I was 'pleasant' to have in class. I would only ask questions in subjects I was interested in (Maths and Physics) and I did most of my other learning as a kid myself, in private outside of school. I realized years later that my brain development was vastly ahead of people my own age, but that I was also battling a developmental disability as well. I, nor my teachers had no idea at the time, I just assumed it was like that for everyone else too, but just that they were better at concentrating then I was.

In university I was a different person. In Philosophy I was the 'class alpha' without question. I would ask questions that both the class and the lecturer immediately said were great questions, and he/she would then answer them as part of the lecture.
I guess this makes me a teacher pet in Uni at least.
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# 3 : Saturday 30-5-2020 @ 19:35
 
 
Someone said :

If I were your teacher I would have stopped the lesson especially to lecture you about disrespecting someone trying to teach a class. If it was french, you were learning french not biological trivia.

[...]

We were learning to read a text critically, analyse it and answer questions accurately.
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# 4 : Sunday 31-5-2020 @ 00:29
 
 
I wasn't either, I never really cared about what was being taught, when everyone in my class were trying to get their heads around Hamlet I was reading Discworld, Stephen King and Clive Barker, when they were trying to get their heads around basic algebra I was doing quadratic equations. I was reading constantly even on my summer holidays so mostly I just coasted through school. I never corrected a teacher because I didn't care if they were teaching other people the right or wrong thing. It wasn't up to me to educate others only to educate myself so any extra mile I went to was only for my own benefit not anyone else's.

I find the whole idea of correcting a teacher funny to be honest, you can say that it was because you were " learning to read a text critically, analyse it and answer questions accurately." but deep down I think it was just because you wanted to feel smarter than everyone else. It is funny if you think about it because it would mean that you had a superiority complex because you thought you were smarter than everyone else but because no one was acknowledging it had an inferiority complex so felt the need to constantly correct people just to prove to your inferiority complex that your superiority complex was correct. It's all just a rich tapestry
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# 5 : Sunday 31-5-2020 @ 04:25
 
 
Someone said :

We were learning to read a text critically, analyse it and answer questions accurately.

I dont quite understand what you mean... was the class french, or what it "critical text analysis" taught as a french subject or something?
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# 6 : Sunday 31-5-2020 @ 09:27
 
 
Someone said :

I dont quite understand what you mean... was the class french, or what it "critical text analysis" taught as a french subject or something?

When asked questions about a text, in French class, you are expected to understand the question and provide the most accurate answer. It is the same in all classes in fact!

If reading the Little Red Riding Hood, and the teacher asked:
- "How many humans were in Granny's cabin that day?"
or "How many people were in Granny's cabin that day?"
or "How many mammals were in Granny's cabin that day?"

You always expect that it could be a trick question, and I would have answered:
- 3 humans (girl, granny, hunter)
- 4 people if you consider an animal who can talk and reason as a person, 3 otherwise
- 4 mammals, so let's do like they do on the Discovery channel
And for safety I would have added "that we know of..." as I do not know what Granny's been doing all day, and why she was found in bed. Maybe little Red's new Gran'da was hiding under the bed or in the closet.

So naturally I expected she was trying to trick us. She chose to demonstrate her ignorance instead... (The answer was written, so she had plenty of time to pick-up her dictionary and check a few definitions for the French words for "insect" and for "scorpion"...)

Another time, the teacher asked me to write something on the "right-side" of the blackboard . I moved to my left left and wrote the thing.
She insisted I move right and re-do it.
I turned around and made the case to the class that the blackboard was facing us, thus its right-side was the left-side of the person writing on it. Thus I had written the thing on the "right-side" of the board.
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# 7 : Sunday 31-5-2020 @ 09:50
 
 
I'd say you're a great laugh
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# 8 : Sunday 31-5-2020 @ 09:55
 
 
Someone said :
I'd say you're a great laugh

Teachers should be more prepared, and today they are, to kids thinking outside the box the teachers was told was the only box, or the box they had to fit everyone in at the time.

When teachers have more pride in being right than they have in seeing a child take ownership of their learning, then there is a problem. And it is easier to blame the child...
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# 9 : Tuesday 2-6-2020 @ 17:45
 
 
I think you sound like a smart ass, and that you know you sound like a smart ass.
If I was your teacher I would stop the lesson and correct your facetiousness.
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# 10 : Friday 5-6-2020 @ 13:29
 
 
Someone said :
[...]
If I was your teacher I would stop the lesson and correct your facetiousness.

Most "teaching" clerics probably agrees with you, and they were delighted when most Irish parents used to slap their kids if they suggested a teacher had made a mistake, or had abused their authority or the children themselves: 3 options that that they wanted their herds to "think" were equally unlikely. (Not that thinking was on the curriculum)

You may have be influenced by their doctrines more than you'd care to realize...
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# 11 : Friday 5-6-2020 @ 23:41
 
 
No, you're twisting it.

You as a single pupil in a class of 10, 15, 20 other students, don't have the right to derail a class, or act like a troll. You don't have the right to hold the education of a roomful of your peers to ransom in order to mount your clever clogs soapbox.

And also, it's not just about disrupting a class, it's about disrupting a class for the wrong reason. If you were correcting a issue relevant to the class a good teacher ought to thank you for the input, this is called "treating you like an equal".

I'm calling you out for trying to disguise "being a smart ass" as "being correct"; you're trying to disguise 'lawful evil' as 'chaotic good' and then signing it off with an "eating bugs emoji".
The difference between these two idea should be obvious to people of most intelligence levels, but you seem to be behaving as if you don't see it.
Also, teachers are as much a victim of their circumstance as the pupils are. If you're that clever, why don't you accept that teachers are just human beings?

they were delighted when most Irish parents used to slap their kids if they suggested a teacher had made a mistake

Parents slapping their kids for raising an issue? you must be joking.
Where I grew up, if a teacher stepped any where out of line against us our parents would be in the next morning ready to slap the teachers face into next week.

You are wrong for thinking it's clever to troll a teacher with pedantry. A good teacher who cares about your development, as well as keeping a good rapport with the entire class, (not just putting up with trollish attention seekers) would correct that behavior immediately. There maybe other students, who are more intelligent then you, who also spotted the mistake and judged it to be irrelevant to the lesson and just want to get on with things, but now have to put up with someone being a smart ass about it.
"How childish" they might think, "I wish the teacher would tell him to shut up."

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# 12 : Saturday 6-6-2020 @ 12:13
 
 
Someone said :

[...]There maybe other students, who are more intelligent then you, who also spotted the mistake and judged it to be irrelevant to the lesson [...]

In one case, in senior secondary, the mistake she made was in writing: it did not disrupt the class. I highlighted in my answer that the question was wrong, I reworded the question correctly and answered it correctly. I did not want to get a good mark for providing the right answer to the wrong question...
And she decided to persist in her mistake, in writing a "correction" in the margins of my answer.

The other time, in senior primary, she asked me to do something. I literally did what she was literally asking. She felt the need to interrupt the lesson herself to point out that I was mixing my right and my left. At that point, I replied that she was the one mixing the right and left of the board. She should have laughed the matter off and see that different people have different points of view, especially when symmetry is involved. She could even have used it in a lesson we had that week about symmetry (point and line symmetry).

For the phonetics lesson, senior secondary, the teacher asked me to point the IPA symbols used in "money".
I pointed to the correct symbol and she insisted that I was wrong and that "money" was pronounced as in the painter's Monet. She would not accept that the "o" was the same as the "u" of "duck", and the "ey" was the same as the the "y" of "deary" or the "i" of "sister".
She insisted I was wrong.
I showed her the pocket dictionary I had used the years before when I had been taught IPA by a proper teacher (4 years prior... in her class no one had heard of IPA up to that day...) She dismissed it, as a shabby pocket dictionary. Then she praised her teacher's pet who piped in to ask me to be respectful of the teacher who knew best... Up to my arrival in that class mid-year, that girl had been seen as the best in most topics... so she was not impressed with my arrival...
Also we had been taught English in the Caribbeans, and when we returned to that town, inár mbaile dúchais , which we had left as children 7 years prior, the others were amazed that we were such good A students and they wondered if "they had chairs at school"...

I never disrupted a lesson: I would go to the teacher after the class, or I would make my points in writing. But if challenged by the teacher, I would stand my ground.

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# 13 : Saturday 6-6-2020 @ 14:12
 
 
Fair enough.

Also, If I sounded confrontational I apologize for that. I think I was projecting some of my own frustrations on the topic.
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