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It’s Our Sisters’ Year
 
# 1 : Saturday 19-9-2020 @ 09:58
 
 
Every series on Netflix this year has strong female leads, women saving men, men being wrong unless they are gay, and empowered women.
Even a good few M2F characters with more depth than usual (they can start as baddies and turn kinda good without conforming to an expected patteren, cis or trans).

And most gay couples in ads are women.

Is this the best year for female and lesbian representation this year?
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# 2 : Sunday 20-9-2020 @ 11:49
 
 
Someone said :
Every series on Netflix this year has strong female leads, women saving men, men being wrong unless they are gay, and empowered women.
Even a good few M2F characters with more depth than usual (they can start as baddies and turn kinda good without conforming to an expected patteren, cis or trans).

And most gay couples in ads are women.

Is this the best year for female and lesbian representation this year?

It's not really a good thing if you look at it, any M2F character they have is usually someone who passes well and is relatively attractive so already they are enforcing an idea that "This is what 'real' Transsexuals look like" and as you say most gay couples in ads are women, the reason for all that is they want to be able to say "Look at us, we support the LGBT community" but they want to do it in a way that won't offend straight men because most straight men would happily fuck a Transsexual who passes well (as long as no one ever found out) and most straight men have no problem seeing two lesbians kissing as long as they are attractive which they usually are in ads.

It would be a completely different story if the TS's didn't pass well or if the gay couple were men so really all they are doing is showing idealised scenarios that are designed to pander to one specific group but selling it as some great thing they are doing for society but in reality they are only enforcing long held stereotypes.
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# 3 : Sunday 20-9-2020 @ 12:54
 
 
In 3%, last series, the character of Ariel, played by Marina Matheus, has the right balance I think between passing depending on the light and being obviously and shamelessly a trans woman.

And her story line is never about being trans: it is about changing alliances and being the lesbian love interest of one of the principal protagonists.

Representation always starts with the stereotypical characters, first in a negative light or for comic relief, then shifting to positive and finally neutral focus. When she can be trans, playing a trans character, without the need for a trans storyline, then you know she has reached mainstream status.

In trans-america, a cis-woman played a trans who struggles to pass. That was a nice twist I though. Some might argue that the actress should have been a trans-woman (other actresses were trans), but then the outcry would have been about the focus on not passing as if they were generalizing.
We cannot always say “it’s not good enough” against steps that lead to the mainstreaming/normalization of social standards.
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# 4 : Sunday 20-9-2020 @ 13:17
 
 
My first memory of positive exposure to transgenderism was when I was 22, 22 years ago, with a song where Mylène Farmer states that she is uncontrovertibly a boy:


I was 2 when the first positive comedy about drag queens and gay couples hit the top of the charts, with La cage aux folles (The birdcage): very stereotypically gaudy and overly camp, but it contributed to exposure of the main stream to gay themes. (It only made it to the USA in 1996...)

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# 5 : Sunday 20-9-2020 @ 13:31
 
 
Someone said :
In 3%, last series, the character of Ariel, played by Marina Matheus, has the right balance I think between passing depending on the light and being obviously and shamelessly a trans woman.

And her story line is never about being trans: it is about changing alliances and being the lesbian love interest of one of the principal protagonists.

Representation always starts with the stereotypical characters, first in a negative light or for comic relief, then shifting to positive and finally neutral focus. When she can be trans, playing a trans character, without the need for a trans storyline, then you know she has reached mainstream status.

In trans-america, a cis-woman played a trans who struggles to pass. That was a nice twist I though. Some might argue that the actress should have been a trans-woman (other actresses were trans), but then the outcry would have been about the focus on not passing as if they were generalizing.
We cannot always say “it’s not good enough” against steps that lead to the mainstreaming/normalization of social standards.

Maybe it is just me (I'm a cynic at the best of times) but I just don't like any trans character in general because their A-typical sob stories usually makes us look like someone to be pitied but most of the trans community seem to lap it up and tend to idolise and identify with them. Personally I think they paint a negative image of us as a whole like we are all desperate to be accepted/desperate for a man/can never really pass as a woman/are manically depressed, pick your poison and usually they are the most boring, one dimensional characters going.
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# 6 : Sunday 20-9-2020 @ 15:07
 
 
Have a look at Ariel character, if you have Netflix.

She starts in a position of power, no sob story really, and her choices are ethical not medical.


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# 7 : Sunday 20-9-2020 @ 15:35
 
 
Someone said :
Have a look at Ariel character, if you have Netflix.

She starts in a position of power, no sob story really, and her choices are ethical not medical.


To be honest I won't watch it, I just have a rule now that I never watch anything (TV shows, movies, documentaries) with trans characters because it just annoys me how far from the reality they really are. The truth is that if any show/movie makes a point of letting you know that the character is trans then the storyline depends on you constantly being aware of it even if it is not part of the plot. If the part requires a trans woman to play it then it doesn't matter if the character never mentions it is still part of the plot because if it wasn't then they would just have a cis woman play it so because you are being made aware of it you're not seeing it as the plot is happening to a woman you are seeing the plot is happening to a transsexual so your reaction to the storyline will be different
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# 8 : Monday 21-9-2020 @ 01:17
 
 
Are you calling for the invisibility of trans characters?
So there is no way in your book for trans representation?
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# 9 : Tuesday 22-9-2020 @ 17:41
 
 
Someone said :
Are you calling for the invisibility of trans characters?
So there is no way in your book for trans representation?

No, to be honest I don't care either way, I barely watch tele nowadays and if I do I prefer shows from like 10 years or more ago and I pass well enough that a lot of the stereotypes created by these characters never really affect me anyway I just don't see why I should throw a ticker tape parade every time a show or movie has a one dimensional trans character in it.
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# 10 : Tuesday 22-9-2020 @ 20:47
 
 
That’s what makes Ariel: she is multidimensional, and her transhood is not at the forefront, it is only part of her background story without being “a big thing”: she might as well have studied 2 years in Blackrock college...

It does not require throwing a rave. But it’s a nice touch.


Do you feel like these gay men who never liked gay pride because they always passed in society unnoticed and are not comfortable with the focus on the “visibly gay” campness? Forgetting that their right to inherit from their husbands or not be blackmailed at work come from that visibility and activism?

Thus becoming an ally of discrimination by invisibilisation?
A form of “internalized transphobia” stemming from a level of self-loathing?

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# 11 : Tuesday 22-9-2020 @ 21:21
 
 
Someone said :
That’s what makes Ariel: she is multidimensional, and her transhood is not at the forefront, it is only part of her background story without being “a big thing”: she might as well have studied 2 years in Blackrock college...

I've still no interest in it

Someone said :

Do you feel like these gay men who never liked gay pride because they always passed in society unnoticed and are not comfortable with the focus on the “visibly gay” campness? Forgetting that their right to inherit from their husbands or not be blackmailed at work come from that visibility and activism?

I can't comment on that because I'm not a gay male and I've always been open about who I am so it's not something I can relate to, I honestly have no concept of what it is like to be "in the closet" because I just didn't care what other people thought so I can't comment on how comfortable or uncomfortable other people are about their own situation.
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# 12 : Tuesday 22-9-2020 @ 22:53
 
 
The gay men I was referring to are not closeted: more like anti-pride...
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# 13 : Tuesday 22-9-2020 @ 22:56
 
 
Someone said :
The gay men I was referring to are not closeted: more like anti-pride...

I still can't relate, I don't think like a gay man
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# 14 : Wednesday 23-9-2020 @ 06:48
 
 
Someone said :

I still can't relate, I don't think like a gay man

It also works for lipstick lesbians who would wince at the sight of a buch one.
There is no such thing as “thinking like a gay man”... and no one thinks like anyone else...

It may be referred to as a form of displaced “Uncle Tommery” in a way.
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# 15 : Wednesday 23-9-2020 @ 10:32
 
 
Someone said :

It also works for lipstick lesbians who would wince at the sight of a buch one.
There is no such thing as “thinking like a gay man”... and no one thinks like anyone else...

It may be referred to as a form of displaced “Uncle Tommery” in a way.

I don't think like a lesbian either, my situation is completely different so I'll clarify, I don't think like gay people in general, their issues are vastly different to my issues so I'm not going to comment or express an opinion on how their thought processes might work
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